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Clip o’ the Day: It’s Like M*A*S*H But Different


 

Just when you think you’ve seen the main title to every show from the ’70s, you find another one. This show, called Roll Out!, ran on CBS in the 1973-4 season, and was a half-hour comedy set during World War II. It looks a lot like M*A*S*H, which had premiered the previous season, and the creators of the show were the producers of M*A*S*H — Larry Gelbart and Gene Reynolds. The network asked them to come up with another war comedy, so to counterbalance M*A*S*H, a show with no black regulars (after Spearchucker was dropped during the first season) they created a period war comedy that would comment on contemporary race issues. I’ve never seen the show so I have no idea how good or bad it was. IMDB says Gelbart wrote seven of the eleven aired episodes himself, the same season he was writing fourteen episodes of M*A*S*H. A prolific man, is what I’m saying.


 
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Clip o’ the Day: It’s Like M*A*S*H But Different

  1. Not a peep on Elizabeth Taylor?

    I thought that would be your first thread of the day, yesterday.

  2. Not a peep on Elizabeth Taylor?

    I thought that would be your first thread of the day, yesterday.

    • I wrote our "Need To Know" on Taylor. I'm not sure what else to say that hasn't been said. She was very beautiful, very talented with certain limitations (e.g. her high-pitched voice, which made it hard for her to sound really authoritative), and like a lot of stars of her era, got into a lot of bad projects, first in the declining years of the studio system and then in the era of independent production. But she made some fine movies and gave some terrific performances, especially in Virginia Woolf? where she and Mike Nichols even turned the high pitch of her voice into an asset.

      • I just figured since it was such big news there'd be a blog entry on it. End of an era and all that.

        I never noticed a high-pitched voice…but that's generally said about any woman.

    • I am 40 years old and my whole life I have been wondering what the big deal about Taylor was. She was famous for being famous. I don't know anything about her career but my impression is her fame mostly happened before mid 1960s – even baby boomers don't seem to bothered with Taylor. Most of Taylor's fans have died off, I think.

      • Elizabeth Taylor ….wealthy, world famous Oscar winning actress and you don't know anything about her?

        Oh well….if something happened before the 60's I guess it doesn't count eh?

        • Don't forget absolutely beautiful in her prime.

      • You can say the same thing about any star who peaked young, though, no? Taylor made her last really first-rate movie when she was only in her mid-'30s.

        But she was in a number of movies that remain popular today with people who like older movies (A Place in the Sun, Giant, Virginia Woolf, National Velvet), so that's explanation enough for her fame. Granted that's not the whole explanation; she was more famous than other old movie stars — say, Olivia De Havilland, who's still alive — because her marriages, and then her friendship with Michael Jackson and her ahead-of-her-time AIDS activism — kept her in the public eye for a long time after her movie career was over. It's been a long time since she made a movie but it's not that long since the '80s, when she was a very prominent public figure.

        • And don't forget (again) that she was absolutely beautiful in her prime. Plus there was the whole Richard Burton and the humongeous diamond thing. Plus the subsequent marriages plus all the other stuff …

          • Yes, absolutely beautiful, and she lived her life like a man, so she was also totally scandalous. LOL

            I'm not much for movies at any time, but she's considered to be the last of the movie stars.

        • "You can say the same thing about any star who peaked young, though, no? ….. Granted that's not the whole explanation … "

          I obsess with books/music, indifferent towards movies/tv. Celebrity stuff does not excite me either. Explains my bafflement with Taylor.

          How you describe Taylor's career, sounds like A Jolie, will OriginalEmily1's children be squawking about her in forty years and will the grandchildren be saying wtf?

          • It really depends on how many movies Jolie makes that stand the test of time — if she has a National Velvet or Virginia Woolf that are still acclaimed.

            Also, since you say you obsess over music — music is certainly not devoid of artists who do their best work when they're young but are still famous when they haven't done great work in a long time.

          • People watch classic movies much as they read classic books and listen to classical music.

            As for 'peaking young', there wasn't and still isn't, much call for 'older women' in movies. Movies are primarily made for men….'dick flicks'…..while women get stuck with 'chick flicks'.

  3. I wrote our "Need To Know" on Taylor. I'm not sure what else to say that hasn't been said. She was very beautiful, very talented with certain limitations (e.g. her high-pitched voice, which made it hard for her to sound really authoritative), and like a lot of stars of her era, got into a lot of bad projects, first in the declining years of the studio system and then in the era of independent production. But she made some fine movies and gave some terrific performances, especially in Virginia Woolf? where she and Mike Nichols even turned the high pitch of her voice into an asset.

  4. I just figured since it was such big news there'd be a blog entry on it. End of an era and all that.

    I never noticed a high-pitched voice…but that's generally said about any woman.

  5. I am 40 years old and my whole life I have been wondering what the big deal about Taylor was. She was famous for being famous. I don't know anything about her career but my impression is her fame mostly happened before mid 1960s – even baby boomers don't seem to bothered with Taylor. Most of Taylor's fans have died off, I think.

  6. Elizabeth Taylor ….wealthy, world famous Oscar winning actress and you don't know anything about her?

    Oh well….if something happened before the 60's I guess it doesn't count eh?

  7. You can say the same thing about any star who peaked young, though, no? Taylor made her last really first-rate movie when she was only in her mid-'30s.

    But she was in a number of movies that remain popular today with people who like older movies (A Place in the Sun, Giant, Virginia Woolf, National Velvet), so that's explanation enough for her fame. Granted that's not the whole explanation; she was more famous than other old movie stars — say, Olivia De Havilland, who's still alive — because her marriages, and then her friendship with Michael Jackson and her ahead-of-her-time AIDS activism — kept her in the public eye for a long time after her movie career was over. It's been a long time since she made a movie but it's not that long since the '80s, when she was a very prominent public figure.

  8. In getting back to what Mr. Weinmann DID post about (R.I.P. Ms. Taylor by the way) I do recall this show when I was little.

    I might have only watched one episode (an even only a portion, at that). I remember it had the two main characters fighting over a roast chicken. The roast chicken looked delicious.

  9. Don't forget absolutely beautiful in her prime.

  10. And don't forget (again) that she was absolutely beautiful in her prime. Plus there was the whole Richard Burton and the humongeous diamond thing. Plus the subsequent marriages plus all the other stuff …

  11. Yes, absolutely beautiful, and she lived her life like a man, so she was also totally scandalous. LOL

    I'm not much for movies at any time, but she's considered to be the last of the movie stars.

  12. "You can say the same thing about any star who peaked young, though, no? ….. Granted that's not the whole explanation … "

    I obsess with books/music, indifferent towards movies/tv. Celebrity stuff does not excite me either. Explains my bafflement with Taylor.

    How you describe Taylor's career, sounds like A Jolie, will OriginalEmily1's children be squawking about her in forty years and will the grandchildren be saying wtf?

  13. It really depends on how many movies Jolie makes that stand the test of time — if she has a National Velvet or Virginia Woolf that are still acclaimed.

    Also, since you say you obsess over music — music is certainly not devoid of artists who do their best work when they're young but are still famous when they haven't done great work in a long time.

  14. People watch classic movies much as they read classic books and listen to classical music.

    As for 'peaking young', there wasn't and still isn't, much call for 'older women' in movies. Movies are primarily made for men….'dick flicks'…..while women get stuck with 'chick flicks'.

  15. This is true, though it's also true that Taylor chose some very bad movies in the '60s and early '70s. But then, so did Marlon Brando. But yes, a difference is that Brando, as a man, could get more work past the age of 40 (even if he revived his career by playing much older than he was) than Taylor could, so the work didn't dry up for him the way it did for female stars.

  16. No, not every movie can be a gem. And we seem to be going through a phase where movies depend on gimmicks or a formula instead of telling interesting stories. Maybe that's why people like classic movies.

  17. No, not every movie can be a gem. And we seem to be going through a phase where movies depend on gimmicks or a formula instead of telling interesting stories. Maybe that's why people like classic movies.

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