Compare/contrast


 

John Mraz goes to Washington.

Back in DC, I arrived for lunch at one of the world’s great political bookstores and hangabouts: Kramerbooks and Afterwords Café.  The joint was jumping. I grabbed The Washington Post, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, and headed for a nosh. I even grabbed The New York Post, but that was mostly for a laugh over dessert. According to the press, the U.S. is kicking and fighting for its economic, international and cultural life. Politicians are working around the clock, legislatures are sitting. The population is engaged, involved and at work to solve the challenges of these difficult days. Far from being tired, the electorate demand the constant thrum of federal elections every two years as they seek accountability and results from their leaders. The list of issues at play is encyclopedic: Iraq, Iran, Israel, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Arctic oil and sovereignty, the H1N1 pandemic, national health care, green protectionist tariffs, immigration reform and all manner of things economic are being vigorously debated by both the hoi polloi and the elected. All issues, I might add, that have an immense impact on Canada. As if we didn’t have enough of our own…

There is also room for more energy and engagement from Canadians on all things political – room for a little more of that American spirit if you will – if it could be catalyzed.


 

Compare/contrast

  1. The population is engaged, involved and at work to solve the challenges of these difficult days.

    Yeah, right.