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David Brent Meets Michael Scott, and the Universe Ends


 

When David Brent has his upcoming cameo on next week’s episode of U.S. version of The Office, meeting Michael Scott outside the actual office set, it’ll be the first time the original has crossed over with the remake. (And since Brent’s documentary has actually been released, it may fuel further fan speculation about whether the U.S. documentary-within-a-show actually exists and if the characters will ever see it). But it can’t be the first time a show has crossed over with its remake — as opposed to shows that are continuations of the original, rather than out-and-out remakes.

I can’t think of examples offhand, though, and the crossovers/spinoff master page focuses almost entirely on U.S. shows, making it not much help finding this kind of thing. Any examples of remake shows where the original character showed up to meet the guy who was based on him, the equivalent of (though this never happened) Archie Bunker meeting Alf Garnett or Chrissy from Man About the House wondering why Chrissy from Three’s Company was based on the other girl?

Anyway, I expect David to wish Michael good luck on re-locating, and tell him that “I can’t wait to hear about all the exciting, sexy adventures you’re sure to have against this colorful backdrop.”

I just hope they don’t have David report on how ridiculous Americans are. Gervais already did that this week, and besides, it’s been done. Somewhat poorly.


 
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David Brent Meets Michael Scott, and the Universe Ends

  1. First, instant thought:

    Would Peter Davison's appearance on the new-era Doctor Who count? Granted, whether the new series isn't REALLY a separate entity from the original, but it is a bit more distinct from, say, Star Trek (whose two TV generations were tied together by Roddenberry; there's no such creative overlap with Who)

  2. First, instant thought:

    Would Peter Davison's appearance on the new-era Doctor Who count? Granted, whether the new series isn't REALLY a separate entity from the original, but it is a bit more distinct from, say, Star Trek (whose two TV generations were tied together by Roddenberry; there's no such creative overlap with Who)

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