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Forgiveness


 

Glen Pearson reflects on Suaad Hagi Mohamud’s appearance at the foreign affairs committee yesterday.

Key people investigating the incident have determined that Ms. Mohamud did absolutely nothing wrong. It was, in fact, her government that had failed her … miserably. There is an investigation under way, yet it is happening specifically because she was innocent. Guilt on her part is not an issue here, but even with that the Government cannot bring itself to apologize. All three opposition parties offered heartfelt apologies. And some of the Government members expressed sorrow at what had happened to her.  But clearly they had been given direction to not apologize for the incident. You could see the struggle in their own eyes and I could tell easily that a couple of them wanted to offer their apologies. But they didn’t and that is just a symbol of much that is wrong at the moment.

A lone woman, a citizen of Canada, telling her story as only she could. It was drama in every sense of the word. In the end, however, the drama was eclipsed by the sobering reality that this could happen to any of us, or our children. There have been too many such incidents of late and people are having trouble believing us when we say we will protect their rights overseas. Something’s not right and the system needs to be fixed. I just don’t know how we can take the next step when a government cannot bring itself to admit its own series of blunders. Ms. Mohamud needs and deserves an apology. We in Parliament need to ask for forgiveness.


 

Forgiveness

  1. It's not just Parliament who needs to ask forgiveness. The Canada High Commission in Kenya should also offer a formal apology for its shameful conduct in this matter.

    • YEah, there's a trail of guilt that probably goes from Canada's HC in Nairobi, and leads to Ottawa, but does NOT pass through Parliament.

    • Parliament, Canadian High Commission, DFAIT, Public Safety, Prime Minister, Ministers, high rnking officials, etc…

      Let's not try to micro manage apologies… Who owes this apology? It is the Governent of Canada as a whole that let her down, that marooned her for months in a country far away from her child, that passed her on to another country as a criminal for prosecution…

      The apology starts and ends at Harper (and maybe Cannon could silently eat crow next to him).

    • Parliament, Canadian High Commission, DFAIT, Public Safety, Prime Minister, Ministers, high ranking officials, etc…

      Let's not try to micro manage apologies… Who owes this apology? It is the Governent of Canada as a whole that let her down, that marooned her for months in a country far away from her child, that passed her on to another country as a criminal for prosecution…

      The apology starts and ends at Harper (and maybe Cannon could silently eat crow next to him).

      • excellent comment.

        while i am always a bit dumbfounded, in this case and others, when folks seem to suggest that blame must be singular in its aim, given the system wide failure here, a singular apology from the top is very much merited.

  2. But you apologize for doing something wrong, and Harper by definition cannot do anything wrong, so don't expect an apology anytime soon Glen.

  3. Glen, is a bit softer on this than he could. not only did the Tories not apologize, they also pressured Ms. Mohamud to waive her right to review any forthcoming report and potentially redact parts or the entire report over privacy concerns, with an implicit suggestion that this was a key determinant in a timely accounting of a full accounting for what happened in her case. indeed brian jean seemed to insinuate that she was morally obliged to do so given that she is seeking damages for her treatment. implying that she may have something to hide in this circumstance is shameful.

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