How we were doing it here, how they do it elsewhere - Macleans.ca
 

How we were doing it here, how they do it elsewhere


 

Kady O’Malley reviews exactly how well the government was doing in advancing its own agenda before it decided to recalibrate. Susan Delacourt reviews all the other national legislatures who lacked the sufficient patriotism to put governing on hold while their respective countries hosted the Olympics.


 

How we were doing it here, how they do it elsewhere

  1. If we prorogue during the Olympics, shouldn't Harper also prorogue during the Special Olympics and the G8/G20 Meeting?

  2. Why is the media being willfully ignorant of the fact that most of the bills that "died": can simply be re-introduced at their current reading provided the opposition does not prove obstructionist ?

  3. (points at Jesse, then makes 'cuckoo' circles at temple)

    Why is Jesse being wilfully ignorant of the fact that the Prime Minister didn't have to kill these bills? Why does he assume that the opposition is obliged to not be obstructionist?

    • Ahhhh but, we get a majority in the Senate if, and only if, session was ended.
      So now all those bills that the Lib Senators were holding up can be brought back, if there is unanomous support in the House.

      So now when Libs pass a bill, they cant get their Senators to stop it…….Opposition Accountability, first time.

  4. because he's smarter than you are

  5. Well yes, and you too. And everybody, really.

  6. This is a cross-post, but I've not had anyone refute it yet so I'll give some of the left/libbers another crack at it.

    February 5, 1996 – Jean Chrétien and the Liberals prorogue Parliament.
    Media reaction: Zzzzzzzzzzz.

    September 18, 1999 – Jean Chrétien and the Liberals prorogue Parliament.
    Media reaction: (Crickets chirping.)

    September 16, 2002 – Jean Chrétien and the Liberals prorogue Parliament.
    Media reaction: Did I hear a pin drop?

    November 12, 2003 – Jean Chrétien and the Liberals prorogue Parliament.
    Media reaction: Stone cold silence.

    December 30th, 2009 Stephen Harper and the Conservatives prorogue Parliament.
    Media reaction: Man the ramparts! Democracy as we know it is in peril! We cannot let this stand!

    If it wasn't a big deal then, why is it now, I mean other than the fact that Stephen Harper's doing it?

  7. Not necessary. He's a participant, so he can justify his absence from parliament.

    Hmm… Just realized that's not clear.. I mean of the G8/G20 meeting, of course..

  8. Because it's being done to kill the committee that's looking into the detainee issue, and the Conservative government leaving in place a policy that forced our soldiers to choose between their orders and human rights. Why do you hate our troops, jarrid?

  9. How I would LOVE to be a fly on the wall in Candace Hoeppner's office as she tries to explain why her private members' bill, which was supposed to have killed the long gun registry, has actually been killed by her own leader.

    What a joke!

  10. I'd like to be a fly on the wall at Iggy's 1.8 million villa in southern France where he's pondering the fate of Western Democracy now that the Conservative have prorogued Parliament for a few weeks while the world and Canadians enjoy the Vancouver Winter Olympics.

    It does look like Iggy's taking this prorogue thing in stride. Come to think of it, of all the Liberals in the December 2008 Coalition fiasco, he was the only one that wasn't running around like a chicken with his head cut off.

    A toast to Iggy, he has such a je ne sais quoi about him!

    One thing's for sure, he has a clear distaste for plebian uprisings. Must be a family thing.

  11. Can other people have a crack at it, or only left/libbers?

  12. I believe that acknowledging context automatically makes one a left/libber in jarridland.

  13. Some math for you, Jarrid aka Soudas-bot:

    Number of days Chretien prorogued: 145 (including 83 for the Chretien-Martin transition + Liberal leadership race/coronation)

    Number of days Harper prorogued: 148

    Years Chretien was PM: 10 years
    Years Harper has been PM: 4 years

    In other words, Harper has prorogued 2.5 times more than Chretien, and counting.

  14. Think about it … both Layton and Iggy are on vacation at the same time. Think. Carefully. About. What. They. Could. Be. Plotting. Together.

  15. Left/libbers are the ones who seem particularly afflicted with "selective outrage syndrome".

  16. At least it's a substantive response Thwim, congrats, you win the steak knives.

    But the Afghan detainee issue, let's get real, that can't be why Parliament prorogued for a few days, no one gives a rat's a** about this issue. Except for the selectively outraged crowd.

  17. The ability to ignore context strikes me as one of the prerequisites – perhaps even the major prerequisite – to being a partisan.

  18. I'm confident that right/conners (what is the opposite of a left/libber) have a similar share of folks with "selective outrage syndrome". The difference is that currently, with the CPC in power, the majority of the opportunities to be selectively outraged will fall to left/libbers.

  19. Btw, how did Harper deal with the coalition fiasco?

  20. He put a stop to it, as well he should. As well he should.

    The Bloc participating in the governance of the December 1st, 2008 Coalition agreement ugly political hybrid entitled "Canada and Quebec".

    Harper put a stop to it, thank goodness.

  21. Sorry Phil, I am trying done trying. I give up on that *5 alarm moron*.

  22. I'm trying to confirm the legislative technique that Harper used about a year ago to call their bluff.

  23. doesn't really say much for the room.

  24. And look, he's got you so flustered that you are adding extraneous words to your posts!!

    Take an aspirin and try again in the morning.

  25. Ignoring context and selective outrage are probably closely related; I'm confident that partisans of all flavours exhibit an excessive level of some combination of those two characteristics.

  26. Parliament wasn't set to come back until Jan 25, so it's 15 days of not watching Goodale sputter.
    I think Canadians can handle it.

  27. Not true. Private Members bills, thanks to Chretien, are not killed by prorogation.

  28. Lizzy May paid Iffy a visit on her way back from Copenhagen,
    Coalition if necessary….

  29. September 16, 2002 – Jean Chrétien and the Liberals prorogue Parliament.
    November 12, 2003 – Jean Chrétien and the Liberals prorogue Parliament.

    OMG, the way the media is all a roar, I thought Harper was setting a precedent proroguing twice in 2 years!
    But it's not so.

    Chretien did it 13 months later,
    so as the AGs Adscam report fell in Martin's lap…

  30. Whatsat? Oh, I'm sorry, Wilson, I got caught up watching Prime Minister Stephen Harper on the only network he turns to when he's seeking credibility with Canadians, rationalizing how the new Stephen Harper who stuffs the Senate with appointees squares with the old Stephen Harper who said he would never stuff the Senate with appointees, before bemoaning the lack of progress on Senate reform in the last 4 years. And wiping the tears of laughter from my eyes.
    But sorry, what was that you were saying? Something about accountability?

  31. In. A. Nice. House. In. France. Or. Maybe. Just. Over. The. Phone.

  32. He who quits and runs away, lives to quit another day.

    • PM Harper did (ask to) prorogue Parliament about a year ago, correct? I was pretty sure that he did, but that date doesn't show up on jarrid's post just above this thread, so I wasn't 100% sure.

  33. Chretien had majorities…not pretty but he as never in danger of losing the confidence of the house…not sure we can say the same for Harper!

  34. I think it's the selective outrage that's the dead giveaway PhilCP.

  35. Except that had Harper not prorogued, we get into the little problem of Peter MacKay and possibly Harper himself being declared in contempt of Parliament by not submitting the documents that Parliament has asked for.

    It is very clear now that Harper desparately does not want these documents to come to light. Personally, I think it's because they probably contain information that would make the public sit up and take notice. I would expect at least one person clued into the facts that telling our soldiers to give over the detainees to the Afghan authorities put them in the position of choosing between War Crimes and disobeying orders, and made this known to the government — which did nothing.

  36. I looked for the House of Commons Calendar, http://www2.parl.gc.ca/housechamberbusiness/chamb… which seems to be set more or less in stone, unless they get all party agreement to make changes. It seems four sitting weeks have been affected by the prorogation, not three, so it's 20 sitting days. But it is also all those potential committee sitting days that have been not only removed from January and February, but also from March. http://www.parl.gc.ca/information/about/process/h… Standing Order 104 (1) seems to show that 10 sitting days, or two weeks for reporting new committees. That seems to put them firmly into a non sitting week, if you go back to the calendar. So committees will only be getting back to arguing over their business in late March.

  37. Why do you hate our troops?

  38. Heh, indeed.

    Not that this tells the whole story of how I feel about our troops, but here goes….

    I occasionally ride the bike trails in Edmonton's river valley. Many of the routes that I use pass over a foot bridge referenced part way down in this link; when I pass the plaque I slow down or stop and shed a small tear for Cpl Dyer and his mates.Has his sacrifice been worth it to date? Will it be worth it if Canada (and allies) stick it out for the long haul? Do we have the will to do that?

  39. Heh, indeed.

    Not that this tells the whole story of how I feel about our troops, but here goes….

    I occasionally ride the bike trails in Edmonton's river valley. Many of the routes that I use pass over a foot bridge referenced part way down in this link; when I pass the plaque I slow down or stop and shed a small tear for Cpl Dyer and his mates.Has his sacrifice been worth it to date? Will it be worth it if Canada (and allies) stick it out for the long haul? Do we have the will to do that?

  40. I wish the answers were more obvious to those questions too.