Iran sentences Canadian blogger to 19 years in prison - Macleans.ca
 

Iran sentences Canadian blogger to 19 years in prison


 

Hossein Derakhshan has been sentenced to more than 19 years in prison, according to an Iranian news source close to Iran’s presidential office.

CBC’s The Current this morning aired very good interviews with Marjan Alemi, Derakhshan’s ex-wife, and with Iranian-Canadian journalist Maziar Bahari, who was jailed by Iran for 118 days last year. The interviews aren’t yet posted on The Current’s website but will be soon. Bahari’s account of his ordeal can and should be read here.

One of the things that struck me in the interviews was Alemi’s assertion that Derakhshan returned to Iran because he had been invited by the Iranian government to work with it. I had heard this this from several Iranian ex-pats but felt I couldn’t publish it without more solid confirmation. Derakhshan is now in the hands of the Revolutionary Guards. Power in Iran is fragmented, and it’s possible that he is a victim of these divisions. But given President Ahmadinejad’s close relationship with the Revolutionary Guards, I feel it is more likely he was set up.

For more context and background on Derakhshan and his arrest and trial, see my article here.

The regime, meanwhile, remains popular with useful idiots outside Iran.


 

Iran sentences Canadian blogger to 19 years in prison

  1. Well I suppose that's better than the death penalty he was thought to be getting.

    • Iranian prison? I'm not so sure.

      • Oh it'll definitely be 'hard time', but he may live long enough to see the revolution this way.

        • You have a point. And there will probably be an amnesty of some kind.

          Iranians in the diaspora are going back to take part in the revolution. I know a woman whose husband stayed in Iran to run his business. He came out a few months ago against the regime. Instead of staying here, safe, she took her two sons and went back to stand with her husband. As she put it, her "cultural identity" is too strong and compelled her to go back there, no matter the danger.

  2. I have appeared on nymerous talk shows with Hotair Derakhshan and am quite conflicted about this news as i have first hand knowledge of what a duplicitous, chauvinist, self-indulgent individual he is. Although i oppose anyone being imprisoned under this tyrannical regime, i cannot help but recall all the words Hossein wrote about Zahra Kazemi being a traitor and about her knowing "what she was getting herself into when she went to Iran." I hope Hossein stares at the dirty walls of his jail cell and is haunted daily by his own words. Words that cut at the very core of Zahra Kazemi's son, Stephan. Hossein derakhshan made the mistake of believing that the monster he was bolstering would not one day turn around and bite him too.

  3. I don't feel sorry for him. He betrayed so many of us and stole money from people. He got what he deserved.

  4. Yes, the government has indeed filtered a lot of political websites, but so has UAE, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Pakistan, Egypt and many other US allies. But Iran doesn't have a policy of imprisoning young men and women for a few words in their small blogs, as the western media would have us believe. – Hossein Derakhshan
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2007/may/

    i wonder if he is sitting in his cell thinking about all the drivel and bilge that he spewed over the years.