'It's unprecedented that Canadian officials were directly responsible for the torture of a Canadian citizen' - Macleans.ca
 

‘It’s unprecedented that Canadian officials were directly responsible for the torture of a Canadian citizen’


 

Abousfian Abdelrazik files suit, on serious charges.

Mr. Abdelrazik, who spent nearly six years in prison or forced exile while his attempts to come home were thwarted, returned to Canada in June after Ottawa was ordered by a federal judge to repatriate the 47-year-old Sudanese-Canadian.

The lawsuit filed Wednesday seeks more than double the $10.5-million the Harper government paid Maher Arar, the Canadian tortured in Syria. The role of Canada’s spies in Mr. Abdelrazik’s case was “far worse,” than in the Arar case, said Paul Champ, one of his lawyers. “Its unprecedented that Canadian officials were directly responsible for the torture of a Canadian citizen.”


 

‘It’s unprecedented that Canadian officials were directly responsible for the torture of a Canadian citizen’

  1. Well, this should be interesting.

    • Much as i empathize with this guy it's going to be tough to prove in a court that the govt or its agents knowingly participated in torture. I wonder if he's better off to persue the line that my country failed in its duty to protect a Canadian citizen. But this stuff grows old real fast. Can anyone imagine a Canadian govt of 20/30 years ago doing this – be it liberal or conservative – i certainly can't.

      • I don't understand how, after apologizing for grave injustice of Japanese internment and other instances of human rights errors, any subsequent Canadian government could engage in that same level of hysterical overreaction and abuse of process.

        The cases of Arar and Abdelrazik and others were a predictable consequence of the atmosphere created by flawed anti-terrrorism legislation, which implied reduced accountability for security agencies. If anything, in a crisis we should expect a greater level of accountability and due process. Otherwise It's as if we are premeditating our apologies.

        • Sadly this sort of case is always predictable and rarely preventable.

  2. It strikes me, from the story, that the Solicitor-General from 2003 has some 'splaining to do, he being the fellow in charge of CSIS. Now, who could that be? (http://www.wayneeaster.com)

  3. How nice…..we let an immigrant into the country who may have ties to terrorism.
    The Liberals forget about him in some god-forsaken crap-hole, then complain that the new Government are infringing upon his rights. New Government lets the dude in…..and the dude files suit against the very country he has no place in to begin with.

    Thank you Pierre Trudeau and your Charter.

    • You must be suffering from post partisan depression. Between the new govt letting the dude in and the suit there's a whole bunch of stuff that he alleges took place. Thanks to the charter we may get to hear what that stuff was. Prior to the charter this case would only have come to light if it was in the govt's interest. Seems like there's little doubt which eventuality you'd prefer.