Janet Napolitano, secretly Canadian - Macleans.ca
 

Janet Napolitano, secretly Canadian


 

Mark Holland, April 23Mr. Speaker, while the minister is in denial, the homeland secretary is making quotes like this, “To the extent that terrorists have come into our country…it’s been across the Canadian border.” Does the public safety minister think this statement is acceptable, that we should just leave it out there, that terrorists come from Canada? Does he realize that such myths cost Canadian jobs and that in a tough economy we cannot afford to have him sitting on the sidelines with his fingers in his ears? He should stand up, speak for Canada, protect Canadian jobs, and confront this appalling lack of knowledge.

Janet Napolitano, May 27. Let me say once again, we know and I know that 9/11 terrorists did not cross the Canadian border.  I regret that the Canadian media only seems to hear an early misstatement by me to that effect.  So let me be perfectly clear: we know that.

Canadian Press, tonightIn the Canadian Press Harris-Decima survey, conducted this summer in the United States and Canada, 29 per cent of Canadian respondents said they believed some of the hijackers accessed the U.S. through Canada eight years ago. Only 19 per cent of American respondents agreed.


 

Janet Napolitano, secretly Canadian

  1. Even if Napolitano is annoyed by this, it's just as well that we beat the US and its administration with this over and over. It's a really dangerous myth.

  2. Pretty ironic that Canadians are less informed than Americans on this.

    • Watching each others' news channels I guess.

  3. Big deal. What's the number that still believes 9/11 was an inside job? Or that Obama wasn't born in the USA?

    There is a significant, non trivial percentage of the population that are just predisposed to believe stuff that is completely batsh!t crazy. Education won't help in these cases.

  4. Big deal. What's the number that still believes 9/11 was an inside job? Or that Obama wasn't born in the USA?

    There is a significant, non trivial percentage of the population that are just predisposed to believe stuff that is completely batsh!t crazy. Particularly once it's been reported as legitimate news. Even if it's debunked later, you'll always get a bunch who will never believe otherwise. Education won't help in these cases.

    • I agree with your larger point here, but I still find 29% a bit alarming. That seems a bit beyond the tinfoil hat threshold of credulity.

      • Well I'm probably overstating the effect of that here. More likely it reflects the people that for the most part don't tune in much to non-celebrity-related current events. At one time it was reported by the media that the attackers crossed in Canada. I don't find it at all hard to believe that such news might have gotten past the filter of the "non-involved", but subsequent, less sensational reports clarifying the matter didn't make it through the filter.

      • Well I'm probably overstating the effect of that here, and yeah, 29% is too much to write off as the "batsh!t crazy" crowd. More likely it reflects the people that for the most part don't tune in much to non-celebrity-related current events. At one time it was reported by the media that the attackers crossed in Canada. I don't find it at all hard to believe that such news might have gotten past the filter of the "non-involved", but subsequent, less sensational reports clarifying the matter didn't make it through the filter.

        • It could even be poorly worded poll. If a poll asks a question like: "Do you believe some of the hijackers came through Canada", as opposed to "Name the countries you understand the hijackers came through.", the former would surely yield a higher percentage for Canada.

          I'd need to see the questions, obviously, but it's worth considering until discounted.

  5. Happens when a significant portion of the Canadian population gets what passes for news
    from US sources. Particularly when what passes for news is an interchangeable gaggle of
    "analysts" spouting he said-she said nonsense over four hour segments that get rotated
    through pretty anchors six times a day for days at a time. And that's the truth, Ruth.

    • Throw in a government giving its people a steady diet of fear and hate mongering, you've got the perfect recipe for making a gullible and illogical bunch.

  6. "I regret that the Canadian media only seems to hear an early misstatement by me to that effect."

    Hmm…

  7. None of the 9/11 hijackers came over the border but one, less than a year earlier did. Ahmed Rassam was the guy cught at Port Angeles.

    Like any myth it starts with some small grain of something that was true.

    But John G has it right, a percentage of the population will believe the craziest things. You can only hope it stays under 20%, anything above that starts to be mainstream.

  8. And maybe our political nastiness has caused a ripple effect to all this sort of stuff. If you've tuned out of the politics, have you also tuned out to everything other than local news? Such that your understanding of things is based on 2006 "facts" and you didn't get the revised newscasts.

    • It's worse than you think, Canadians are tuning into local news, but local for Detroit or Rochester or Seattle. They don't even know what's happening in their own communities, let alone province or country.

  9. Hmmm, lets see, 29% …. awfully close to the generally accepted estimate of the Conservative base.

  10. And 64% of Canadians now believe they are communists because of our healthcare system.