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Lawrence Cannon meets Iranian counterpart, awkward pauses in the conversation ensue


 

Here’s his take on the meeting, via the CBC

And here’s Iran’s, via Press TV, with a nauseating explanation of Zahra Kazemi’s murder and the ongoing detention of Canadian journalist Maziar Bahari. 

Press TV’s Canadian correspondent, Zahra Jamal, incidentally, continues to churn them out.


 

Lawrence Cannon meets Iranian counterpart, awkward pauses in the conversation ensue

  1. There's nothing majorly wrong with the article from Press TV. It presents the story in a straightforward, non judgmental fashion. So what's your beef?

    • You're absolutely right, Robert. It's a remarkably straightforward piece … textbook Journalism 101, you might say.

      >>Iranian officials said the journalist had died after falling and hitting her head during a hunger strike. Canada, however, condemned Iran, claiming that it was a case of 'state-sanctioned murder'.

      What the hell is wrong with Michael Petrou that he considers this a "nauseating" explanation?

    • My beef is this:

      Zahra Kazemi's death is not a case of case of Iran saying one thing, and Canada saying another, and no-one can get to the bottom of what really happened, so let's just leave it be.

      There is extensive evidence that she was tortured, raped, and murdered. This includes: the testimony of Shahram Azam, a former military doctor who examined her broken body; an admission by then Iranian vice president Mohammad-Ali Abtahi that she had died from a beating; and admission of the same by then Iranian health minister Masud Pezeshkian; the testimony of several prisoners who were jailed with Kazemi and have since spoken to journalists, myself included; an admission by the former Iranian ambassador to the United Kingdom, who was quickly forced to retract his statement and then recalled; that Iran's official story changed, from claiming that Kazemi had died of a stroke to that she had fallen and hit her head; that Iran refused to release her body for an autopsy.

      All this is on the public record. For Press TV to ignore all this is “majorly wrong” and turns my stomach.

      The same goes for its depiction of Maziar Bahari's confession as legitimate given the extensive torture that has gone on since June 12 to extract similar confessions.

      • >> Zahra Kazemi's death is not a case of case of Iran saying one thing, and Canada saying another, and no-one can get to the bottom of what really happened, so let's just leave it be.

        Well, actually, it **IS** a case of Iran saying one thing and Canada saying another. As you yourself note, Iran's official position is that she died after falling and hitting her head. Which is exactly what the Press TV story says — properly attributing it to "Iranian officials". Yes, of course they are lying, but it's not wrong of Press TV to report Iran's official position. That happens to be the way we practice journalism in the West, y'know — we give both sides of the story, even if we know someone is lying. Ever notice that quotations in independent, Western new stories typically use some form of attribution such as "he said" or "he declared" or sometimes "he claimed," yet never "he lied"?
        The important point here is that Press TV gave equal time to Canada's position, which is that Zahra Kazemi was murdered. Let's give readers some credit and assume that they are capable of deciding for themselves whether to believe the Iranian regime's version of events or the Canadian version.

      • You'd have a point if the story was about Kazemi's death. But it wasn't. It was about the meeting between Cannon and Mottaki. Therefore all the writer needed to do was remind the audience why Kazemi's death has caused diplomatic tension between Canada and Iran.

  2. And what is he going to write when something truly "nauseasting" occurs?

  3. When I read the nauseating line that Michael referred to on PressTV's website my face twisted in disgust. The revolutionary terrorist regime in Teheran just keeps shooting in both of its feet – the first foot represents its people, and the second foot represents its international legitimacy.

    I am counting the days until a popular Iranian revolution overthrows these barbarians from power.

  4. Since Michael has discussed Press TV in the past…it`s interesting to note that a few media reports here at home have noted that Amanda Lindhout, the Canadian freelancer who was kidnapped in Somalia over a year ago, worked for Press TV for a while.

    This might be an interesting angle to dig deeper in – Canadian female freelancer has no problem working for Islamic regime`s mouthpiece, leaves that gig, and then moves on to freelance in one of the world`s most dangerous places to work for anyone, let alone western female journalists poking around? I`m sure her work for Press TV had nothing to do with that, but more interestingly, it has the whiff of, at best, an “innocent abroad” and at worst someone who has displayed very bad judgement.

  5. I`m not saying we shouldn't try and get her out of whatever hell hole she is stuck in, but it's a little disingenuous for some to claim that governments have done very little to help her out when she hasn't shown the greatest judgement in the past on this sort of thing.

    It`s kind of like the person who skis out of bounds and ends up having to be rescued by police or fire…then complains that nothing was done to help them.

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