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May’s April


 

We are reluctant to write much about the Green Party of Canada in this corner. There are two reasons, and here they are now.

(a) One seemingly not-entirely-hinged reader has taken to haranguing me and ITQ about our refusal to give proper scrutiny to the (as he sees her) nefarious Elizabeth May. ITQ and I worry that if we actually wrote about the Greens we would only encourage this fellow, and we seriously don’t want to do that.
(b) THE GREEN PARTY OF CANADA HAS NO SEATS IN PARLIAMENT!!! Sorry for shouting, but this is what ITQ and I want to say to the fellow in point (a) as an explanation for (as he sees it) shirking our duty: It feels unaccountably more rewarding to pay attention to people with power than to pay attention to people without power.

(Incidentally, if you’re wondering why the Green leader should not have a spot on the already-crowded stage at the next election leaders’ debate, I recommend a careful inspection of the first 10 words of point (b). But I digress. Onward.)

As I say, we are reluctant to write Green here at Inkless, but it has been an eventful few weeks over there. To wit:

Four members of the party’s Federal Council appear to have resigned, and one of them says that in his own case, it’s because Elizabeth May showed up in person to bushwhack his nomination meeting. This is causing some grumbling among Green party members, some of whom are recalling that during the last campaign, May seemed eager to have the party fold its tents rather than standing as an obstacle to the Liberals. (Note that May hotly disputes this interpretation, or indeed any interpretation whatsoever: “I didn’t have a very well-formed idea at all… I had no actual plan… I didn’t have an actual proposal… It wasn’t a clear idea that I was putting forward.”)

(Incidentally, if you’re wondering why the Green leader should not have a spot on the already-crowded stage at the next election leaders’ debate, ask yourself — after carefully considering the first 10 words of point (b) above — whether it’s really fair for the Liberal leader, who thinks the Liberal leader must at all costs be prime minister, to be joined onstage by a special auxiliary backup party leader who also thinks the Liberal leader must at all costs be prime minister. But I digress again. Onward.)

Very interesting, if you’re the kind of person who is interested in the escapades of zero-MP political parties. There. I did my bit. No more. And you, sir — yes, you know who you are — get off our backs!


 
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