5

She Rocks The Airwaves From Coast To Coast


 

I’m not saying that this is the title sequence that defines the early ’80s, because, well, I’ve never seen a single episode of the show it belongs to. (Wikipedia says it aired in syndication in 1982-3, just preceding the glut of first-run syndicated comedies.) But come on: a show starring a wisecracking puppet, supported by Corey Feldman and the other girl from Vega$? With a peppy theme song and credits that tell us what everyone’s relationship is to the puppet? This was TV circa 1982.

There have been worse periods for television — there were actually quite a few good shows that started in the 1982-3 season — but thanks to a combination of network desperation and the rise of the first-run syndie market, there have been few eras where more insane (and cheap-looking) stuff made it onto our TV screens.


 
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She Rocks The Airwaves From Coast To Coast

  1. Thank, I had managed to block that from my pitiful existence until you posted this. DRAT!

  2. This might characterize the network's early Reagan-era desperation, but this show itself seems like it would've been more at-hom later in the 80's, as an attempt to cash in on the success of ALF.

    They were just a tad too early with the "unprolific actors playing second fiddle to a wisecracking puppet" thing.

  3. That puppet actually showed up in an early episode of Family Guy. Up until right now I had always just assumed that it was 'Family Guy being weird', but I guess they were basing it on something.

    http://www.tv.com/family-guy/fifteen-minutes-of-s

  4. And yet there is a condition known as madamism which refers to the puppet, too much plastic surgery

    And I see Comedy Network has a Jeff Dunham show coming. I like Dunham but I dont think the show will do him any good.

  5. Oh my god. It burns. I remember Madame and that Flowers guy doing the rounds of things like Match Game and always thought how weird it was that this guy's entire act was based on working a puppet that was basically Bea Arthur.

    But let's face it, network tv being the trailing indicator it is, this was a creature of the 1970s (with the disco theme to prove it). For whatever reason, ventriloquists & puppets were big in the 70's. Big on talk shows, game shows — big enough that they even satirized it on SOAP (which WAS actually groundbreaking…)

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