'The Government is pleased' - Macleans.ca
 

‘The Government is pleased’


 

Rob Nicholson’s office releases a statement in regards to the Supreme Court’s decision.

“The Government is pleased that the Supreme Court has recognized the ‘constitutional responsibility of the executive to make decisions on matters of foreign affairs in the context of complex and ever-changing circumstances, taking into account Canada’s broader interests.’ The Supreme Court overturned two previous lower court decisions and ruled that the Government is not required to ask for accused terrorist Omar Khadr’s return to Canada. Omar Khadr faces very serious charges including murder, attempted murder, conspiracy, material support for terrorism, and spying. The Government will carefully review the Supreme Court’s ruling and determine what further action is required.”


 

‘The Government is pleased’

  1. The leftist socialist Liberal shill anti-Canadian Supreme Court is biased, partisan and hates Stephen Harper.

    Um, nevermind. Save that one for another day.

  2. Way to skate around the part of their ruling that found the accused's rights had been violated, Rob. You're right, you DO need to review the decision carefully.

  3. Mr. Nicholson then raised his middle finger at the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and made nyah nyah nyah noises.

  4. Returning to my earlier suggestion…. wouldn't it be great if we had a show with Nicholson in front of the "At Issues Panel" in the next week or so.

  5. I am sure there will be questions raised in the House about this case. Oh wait. Never mind.

    • yeah it is egregious that they will line up their response without ever having to hear from the opposition on the floor. shame.

  6. The government is pleased that, among other things it is more understandably pleased about, the Court affirmed that “Canada actively participated in a process contrary to Canada’s international human rights obligations and contributed to Mr. Khadr’s ongoing detention so as to deprive him of his right to liberty and security of the person guaranteed by s. 7 of the Charter, contrary to the principles of fundamental justice”? Really?

    Well that just seems wrong in quite a number of ways.

    • If you thought they wouldn't be, you clearly haven't been paying attention to this government then.

  7. Yeah, denying someone (regardless of how odious a crime they committed) their habeus corpus rights is a pretty "complex circumstance".

  8. The primary violations of Mr. Khadr's rights occurred, of course, under the previous government, not this one. The court's finding that his rights continue to be violated stems from the continued use of the impugned interrogation results. If the US agreed not to use those materials it would seem his Charter rights would no longer be involved.

  9. The primary violations of Mr. Khadr's rights occurred, of course, under the previous government, not this one. The court's finding that his rights continue to be violated stems from the continued use of the impugned interrogation results. If the US agreed not to use those materials it would seem his Charter rights would no longer be involved.