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This is why we can’t have nice things


 

In inadvertent tribute to Michael Jackson, Glen Pearson plays the man in the mirror card.

Yet something has altered between citizens and their government, and while citizens have been quick to condemn politics for their feelings of isolation, perhaps they have failed somewhat in themselves to reach the lofty heights Martin hoped for. I understand that a politician shouldn’t even venture close to such an assertion, yet I don’t see how we can find a better place when blame is leveled exclusively on politicians alone – it is a two-way street and there must be work done on both sides. That is being undertaken by both politicians and citizens, but not at enough of a critical mass to change the system.

Citizens have changed, not just in their pessimism but in the sophistication they bring to that cyniscism. The average Canadian today is far more cosmopolitan. With more information than ever at their disposal, they learn more quickly the flaws within the political system. Yet, like the politician, they exist at two different levels. Citizens might not compost much, yet they know of the steady decline in rain forests and the challenges inherent in climate change – something their forebears would barely have known. But their acts don’t match their knowledge. They want their children to have a top notch education yet often refuse higher taxes to pay for it, much as they do with healthcare.  Political representatives live a similar kind of dual existence.


 

This is why we can’t have nice things

  1. I really hope this guy doesn't burn out too quickly.

    • I don't think there's any danger of that happening. I like Glen Pearson. His good-natured idealism appeals to me. If I lived in London North Centre, I'd probably vote for him.

  2. I have this feeling that Pearson and Wherry were put on the earth to give me coronary issues.

    I don't even know where to start with the bollocks that Pearson writes. I will just say that Canadians aren't meant to be living up to any other person's ideal of what they should be/do and we pay enough in taxes to have great education and health programs if only pols and bureaucrats would stop implementing moronic policies and wasting money on frivolities and baksheesh.

  3. I have this feeling that Pearson and Wherry were put on the earth to give me coronary issues.

    I don't even know where to start with the bollocks that Pearson writes. I will just say that Canadians aren't meant to be living up to any other person's ideal of what they should be/do and we pay enough in taxes already to have great education and health programs if only pols and bureaucrats would stop implementing moronic policies and wasting money on frivolities and baksheesh.

    • So in the magical fairy land you live in where citizens take absolutely no responsibility, every problem is solved by the Government at no cost, and education gets better as the taxes go down, do the teachers get paid in magic beans? Do they dissect Unicorns in high school science?

      Back here in reality, you can't abdicate your responsibilities and still expect the Government to pick up your slack free of charge. Shit has to get done, whether by the public sector or private is up to debate – you can't have it both ways though. Either you have a larger Government cleaning up the problems of an irresponsible public, or you have responsible Citizens fill the void a Government leaves.

      It's nice to want things, but sooner or later someone has to pay for it.

    • Aaron I forgot to mention after my coronary issues that Maru the cat has new video out (I think it was you that posted link to Maru a few weeks ago). This time he does his thing with boxes as owner gets ready to move.

      Silly Walks
      For some reason, public servants get paid 40% more in salary/benefits compared to equal job in private sector, we are giving billions of $$$ to bankrupt companies, hundreds of millions to cultural events that don't need extra funding because they are already successful … etc. The list is endless really and there is plenty of fat to be cut to pay for unicorns and the like before we have to raise taxes even more to pay for programs that few of us want.

    • Aaron I forgot to mention after my coronary issues that Maru the cat has new video out (I think it was you that posted link to Maru a few weeks ago). This time he does his thing with boxes as owner gets ready to move. My two fav scenes are at 1:50 and 2:45.

      Silly Walks
      For some reason, public servants get paid 40% more in salary/benefits compared to equal job in private sector, we are giving billions of $$$ to bankrupt companies, hundreds of millions to cultural events that don't need extra funding because they are already successful … etc. The list is endless really and there is plenty of fat to be cut to pay for unicorns and the like before we have to raise taxes even more to pay for programs that few of us want.

    • Aaron I forgot to mention after my coronary issues that Maru the cat has new video out (I think it was you that posted link to Maru a few weeks ago). This time he does his thing with boxes as owner gets ready to move. My two fav scenes are at 1:50 and 2:45.

      Silly Walks
      For some reason, public servants get paid 40% more in salary/benefits compared to equal job in private sector, we are giving billions of $$$ to bankrupt companies, hundreds of millions to cultural events that don't need extra funding because they are already successful … etc. The list is endless really and there is plenty of fat to be cut to pay for unicorns and the like before we have to raise taxes even more to pay for programs that few of us want.

      • Which is fine to say, but hacking on a guy for saying citizens need to do more and get more involved is another matter entirely. Also that number can't be even close to across the board. There's no way teachers at a public school are making more than university profs, or teachers at an expensive private school. If you wanted to get down to specific apples to apples comparisons I'm sure I'd be right there with you on most of them, but posting absurdly generalized figures does nothing to prove your point.

        If your thesis is that all public servants are overpaid, I couldn't possibly agree with you. Military, Police, and teacher are severely underpaid for the jobs we expect them do do. If your thesis is some public servants are overpaid, well obviously.

        • Beyond dollar amounts, another reason to privatize all that can be privatized (that is, not military or police – although the police that handle traffic violations really do need to get off the road), is that, when the customer makes his purchase, he might begin to think about what he is getting for his money.

          One of our favourite slogans, reverberating with echolalia anytime a child is within a ten kilometer radius is, "Stay In School." We all unhesitatingly agree that "education is important," but we never enter into any sort of discussion as to what kind of education is important.

          Perhaps if parents were paying directly out of their pockets into the hands of their kids' educators, they might begin to contemplate, "just what exactly do I want my child learning?"

  4. So in the magical fairy land you live in where citizens take absolutely no responsibility, every problem is solved by the Government at no cost, and education gets better as the taxes go down, do the teachers get paid in magic beans? Do they dissect Unicorns in high school science?

    Back here in reality, you can't abdicate your responsibilities and still expect the Government to pick up your slack free of charge. Shit has to get done, whether by the public sector or private is up to debate – you can't have it both ways though. Either you have a larger Government cleaning up the problems of an irresponsible public, or you have responsible Citizens fill the void a Government leaves.

    It's nice to want things, but sooner or later someone has to pay for it.

  5. Glen Pearson is simply projecting his own vapid reasoning on to the rest of us:

    " Citizens might not compost much, yet they know of the steady decline in rain forests"

    There is no connection between composting or not composting and the decline in rain forests.

    "They want their children to have a top notch education yet often refuse higher taxes to pay for it, much as they do with healthcare"

    There is no necessary connection between top notch education and higher taxes, anymore than there is a necessary connection between good healthcare and higher taxes.

    There is also no connection between Glen Pearson and rational policy making, just some hand-wringing on why citizens won't give politicians more money to spend, and some whining on the criticism that he and his weak-minded colleagues receive.

    • There is no necessary connection between top notch education and higher taxes, anymore than there is a necessary connection between good healthcare and higher taxes.

      Actually there will always be a direct correlation between how much money is spent on education or health and the outcomes. Even if you make them 100% efficient and effective with existing resources, if you are understaffed or have a shortage of equipment that isn't accounted for in your operating budget, that money must come from somewhere.

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