Eight years later - Macleans.ca
 

Eight years later


 

Stephen Harper’s statement today on the anniversary of 9/11.

Eight years on, the memory of that awful morning in New York and Washington continues to evoke horror and sorrow.  Today we remember the lives that were shattered through those atrocities.  We still grieve for the innocent men, women and children aboard the doomed airplanes and we still mourn the thousands who perished in the collapse of the Twin Towers and in the fires at the Pentagon.

We honour not only those who perished on that day, but also the great sacrifices made by those determined to prevent such a dark day from ever recurring.

The attacks in New York and Washington revealed a truth we had all sensed, but were loath to admit: that terrorism is not something that happens somewhere else, to someone else.  The 24 Canadians killed on 9/11 are a reminder that it can happen to us.

9/11 was a day of hate.  Today we weep, we mourn and we reflect.


 

Eight years later

  1. "Eight years on, the memory of that awful morning in New York and Washington continues to evoke horror and sorrow. "

    Especially as it was an event the was used to drum up support for an even bigger horror; the invasion of Iraq based on fabrications that has resulted in hundreds of thousands of deaths of innocent people. Which Stephen Harper breathlessly supported.

    Thanks, Prime Minister…for helping make that horror so much more substantive and enduring.

    • How specifically did Harper "help make that horror so much more substantive and enduring"?

      • Why do you ask?

        • I'm just trying to help you untangle your rhetoric.

          • No you're not. You're trying to take the force out the point I was making: that the memory of the 9/11 dead has been forever tainted by the cynical politics that used it to mobilize support for an illegal/immoral invasion, one that Harper supported…stridently, vociferously, plagiarizingly…

            If you don't like that, too bad.

          • Sorry to interrupt your spittle-flecked rant. Please, carry on.

    • classy

  2. 24 fellow canadians died that day – and as far as I am concerned anyone who uses this as an opportunity to hide behind the anonymity of the internet and post partisan insults, however thinly veiled proves only one thing … that their soul is in dire need of a good rinsing out with soap. It is beyond pity the feeling I have for people like that and quite frankly it puts shame on all of us. It is most likely from being abandoned as a child, if I remember my university psychology whatever the cause know that there are those that will do their best to forgive you and pray that family and friends of those 24 Canadians don't read your posts

    • What did your university psychology teach you about people who keep others emotional hostages?

  3. your question makes no sense and quite frankly I wouldn't waste the grey matter space to respond even if I knew what you were talking about.

    • Yes, you need that grey matter to remember the names of the 24 dead Canadians, no doubt.

  4. I would have hoped for something a bit more substantial from the Prime Minister. We are in Afghanistan solely because of the events that day. We need to be clear about where we are going and why. Have a look back on today's anniversary and what it means at http://www.policycentre.ca/2009/09/11/lest-we-for

  5. Not a bad tribute, as these things go. But —

    "We honour not only those who perished on that day, but also the great sacrifices made by those determined to prevent such a dark day from ever recurring."

    It is the job of our political leaders to prepare us for the fact that tragedies like 9/11 are going to come again. We cannot prevent them. All we can do is prevent them from frightening us into capitulation, either to the terrorists or to those who would like to exploit our fright. In order to prevent that from happening, we need to be realistic: the world is a dangerous place whether we like it or not, and we're all going to die.

    • It's really kind of sad.. the oceans that border us have made us so weak. Anybody remember the London subway bombing? What about the Japanese anthrax attack? The bombing of the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel? You won't see anybody saying that the entire nation should stop to wail and gnash their teeth over those some 8 years after the fact.

      We've just been so isolated that when we have to deal with a small fraction of what the rest of the world sees every year, it somehow shakes the foundations of our lives. Good lord why? We should be lucky that there are no serious terrorists running around. Do any of us know how easy it'd be to really spread terror? Take the sniper down in Washington. Remember, the guys who drilled a hole in the trunk of their car and were shooting random people? You know how easy that'd be to re-enact but slightly more specifically targetted — say at the families of airport security personnel — and the effects that could have?

      To think, to even suggest to people that this kind of thing won't recur.. that anything we can do can prevent something like this from happening again is not only folly, it's dangerous. It leaves people unprepared. Instead we should be telling people that when this happens again, we'll be ready. Ready to minimize the damage. Ready to catch the perpetrators, and ready to continue on with our lives knowing that we will not let them win.

    • It's really kind of sad.. the oceans that border us have made us so weak. Anybody remember the London subway bombing? What about the Japanese anthrax attack? The bombing of the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel? You won't see anybody saying that the entire nation should stop to wail and gnash their teeth over those some 8 years after the fact.

      We've just been so isolated that when we have to deal with a small fraction of what the rest of the world sees every year, it somehow shakes the foundations of our lives. Good lord why? We're lucky that there are no serious terrorists running around. Do any of us know how easy it'd be to really spread terror? Take the sniper down in Washington. Remember, the guys who drilled a hole in the trunk of their car and were shooting random people? You know how easy that'd be to re-enact but slightly more specifically targetted — say at the families of airport security personnel — and the effects that could have?

      To think, to even suggest to people that this kind of thing won't recur.. that anything we can do can prevent something like this from happening again is not only folly, it's dangerous. It leaves people unprepared. Instead we should be telling people that when this happens again, we'll be ready. Ready to minimize the damage. Ready to catch the perpetrators, and ready to continue on with our lives knowing that we will not let them win.

  6. Can't we let go of partisan snipes on this one? My friend lost her only son (one of the 24 Canadians) on 9/11.

    I think the last thing I want to think about is partisan nonsense on Sept 11th – think about her and her son and forget about politics.

  7. I still remember exactly where I was that morning when people realized what was happening. Then the shocked silence across the entire building as everyone watched the coverage on a conference room TV.

    We were close enough to the city that everyone then left to get their kids from school and check up on friends/relatives who worked in Manhattan.

    I also remember going through the city a short time later. The smell was awful. Raw sewage was in the streets. And New Yorkers, for the first time in my memory, were actually treating everyone like brothers.

  8. I still remember exactly where I was that morning when people realized what was happening. Then the shocked silence across the entire building as everyone watched the coverage on a conference room TV.

    We were close enough to the city that everyone then left to get their kids from school and check up on friends/relatives who worked in Manhattan.

    I also remember going through the city a short time later. The smell was awful. Raw sewage was in the streets. And New Yorkers, for the first time in my memory, were treating everyone like brothers.