46

Why is BioWare apologizing for not having a sappy ending?

Mass Effect 3 is a true work of art––to touch-ups needed


 

AP Photo

Will there ever be a BioWare video game that doesn’t stir up controversy? Usually it’s sex – the first Mass Effect game raised eyebrows for being, as Fox News absurdly put it, “Debbie Does Dallas meets Luke Skywalker,” while Dragon Age: Origins provoked similar reactions with its hot elf-on-elf action. Now, with Mass Effect 3, it’s not sex that’s the problem, it’s the ending.

BioWare co-founder Ray Muzyka on Wednesday issued an apologyfor the ending (there’s actually a few possible ones that are slightly different from each other) and tacitly promised some sort of downloadable fix in the near future:

The team are hard at work on a number of game content initiatives that will help answer the questions, providing more clarity for those seeking further closure to their journey. You’ll hear more on this in April. We’re working hard to maintain the right balance between the artistic integrity of the original story while addressing the fan feedback we’ve received. This is in addition to our existing plan to continue providing new Mass Effect content and new full games, so rest assured that your journey in the Mass Effect universe can, and will, continue.

The apology comes after a host of complaints surfaced online through various fora. Fans were generally upset that the science-fiction trilogy ended on a bittersweet note, and that there wasn’t enough closure for some of the characters.

I’m not going to spoil the ending, but I will say that after playing the game through twice, I couldn’t disagree more with the complaints. I gave Mass Effect 3 a full five-out-of-five stars, since it was as perfect a game as I’ve played. As I said in my review, the game is great because–aside from stellar graphics, sound and gameplay–it requires players to make difficult moral choices that have direct repercussions on the characters and story. Many games try to do this, but they usually do so in a hamfisted, one-choice-is-good-the-other-is-evil kind of way.

The moral choices in Mass Effect games have purposely been more morally ambiguous, which is how they’ve stood apart from the rest. While most “mature” games are rated so because they contain swearing or gore, Mass Effect 3 truly is a game that appeals to “mature” gamers, which is ironically something I wrote about not too long ago.

As for the finale, I like anything that isn’t a typically schlocky Hollywood-style happy ending, or an obvious set-up for yet another sequel (a problem that’s endemic in many big-budget movies and games).

With fiction and entertainment being what they are, there’s no way a particular work is going to please everybody. This is especially true for a video game that is customized by each player’s choices, which is something Muzyka addressed in his apology.

In the case of Mass Effect 3, which shipped 3.5 million copies for launch, it’s safe to assume the thousands of online complaints represented only a small percentage of players. The vast majority either liked the ending(s) just fine, or were satisfied with the game overall.

It’s too early to condemn BioWare’s decision to alter the ending, since it’s not yet known if that’s what is planned, but it does look like something of this sort is going to happen. If so, it’ll be too bad because it’ll set the industry back in its ongoing quest to have its products accepted as art.

After all, few painters would go back and retouch their work after people complain about it–“I like it, but does it come in purple?” Put another way, a closer comparison might be Battlestar Galactica, the fantastic sci-fi series that also ended on a bittersweet note that many fans similarly panned. Executive producer Ron Moore didn’t go back and redo the finale in response to critics. Heck, even George Lucas didn’t axe the universally reviled Jar Jar Binks from The Phantom Menace in one of his umpteen recuts of that movie.

It can be argued that video games are different; that the player is included in the creation of the art because they’re interactive. That’s true in some circumstances but not in the case of narrative-driven games such as Mass Effect. As advanced and open-ended as games have become in general, story-heavy ones do still have to follow the scripted rules of the technology that powers them, at least for now. Players are presented the illusion of creating the story, but in the end the technology limits the possible outcomes. The art of Mass Effect, therefore, is almost all BioWare’s.

By apologizing and promising some sort of fix to please a small percentage of players, BioWare is trying to avoid having Mass Effect 3 become known as the “game with a bad ending,” which is sure to hit sales. In any regard, the studio is placing commerce above art. Now the question is: will the updated content be given to the players who want it for free, or will BioWare try and sell it to them?


 

Why is BioWare apologizing for not having a sappy ending?

  1. I don’t want to spoil anything for other players (nor talk at great length about what is, after all, a video game.) What I will say though, is that the ending being grim did not bother me. I expected grim, and I accepted grim. But the ending wasn’t simply grim, it was also illogical and poorly connected to the rest of the plot. It made the rest of the game feel like preparation for something that didn’t happen.

    I realize that such an opinion doesn’t mean much without examples, but still, that’s my two cents.

  2. “As for the finale, I like anything that isn’t a typically schlocky
    Hollywood-style happy ending, or an obvious set-up for yet another
    sequel (a problem that’s endemic in many big-budget movies and games).”

    So coherence and a connection to the story that immediately preceded the ending isn’t important to you? I guess it’s no wonder that you like the ending as it stands then. As for art not changing, I’ll point out that Arthur Conan Doyle brought Sherlock Holmes back from the dead, and another video game series Fallout 3 changed the ending based on fan feedback. Given that the producers of Mass Effect have from the very beginning emphasized that they view the series as a cooperative venture between them and their fans, it’s hardly surprising they would place a high value on their fan’s opinion of the ending.

    Finally, I take issue your mistatement that it’s a “small percentage” of Mass Effects fans that are unhappy. From CNET to Gamefaqs to the Bioware forums, every poll that’s been taken has shown those unhappy with the ending trouncing those against changing it with at least 70% of the vote, and in some cases as high as 90%.

    • Dude that’s because the majority of people who play video games are just regular people, they don’t stalk around forums and message boards and cast votes on sites they never visit. The mistake here is assuming that the nit-picky ubernerds are the only ones enjoying this franchise.

  3. Mr. Nowak, I applaud the fact that you actually played and finished the game before voicing your opinion about the ending on a public forum.

    However, you are a journalist and, as such, are expected to research the topic before writing about it. Claiming that BioWare is apologizing for “not having a sappy ending” and that the majority of the fans “were generally upset that the science-fiction trilogy ended on a bittersweet note” shows a complete lack of research. Most of the complaints have to do with the fact that the ending is rushed, nonsensical, poorly integrated with the rest of the plot and completely disregards and even invalidates players’ choices.

    That last point is the worst, in my opinion. As you have stated, the greater part of the game’s appeal lies in the fact that the game “requires players to make difficult moral choices that have direct repercussions on the characters and story”. And yet the very ending makes those choices largely irrelevant. Can you honestly claim that the players are not complaining about that, but about the bittersweet ending instead?

    As for the percentage of those who complained out of the whole population of people who bought copies, let’s not pretend we’ve never heard of survivor bias.

    Last, but not the least, the whole “defense of artistic integrity” argument is debatable. The very appeal of Mass Effect that you yourself described is what includes the player in the creative process. They’re not creating a story, they’re creating a character and that character’s arc. Is that art? No, definitely not. Is it creativity? I believe so. Should it override artistic integrity? Not necessarily, but one wonders whether you can truly slap the “gratuitously entitled” label on players who are aggrieved by the way BioWare essentially tore down the results of that creativity.

    I think BioWare should correct the ending, because they stand at the forefront of an industry that needs to ask itself a very important question: are players just audience?

    I respectfully submit my own thoughts on that particular subject: http://beardseye.blogspot.com/2012/03/are-players-just-audience.html

  4. Your headline is completely misleading.

    Despite claiming that gamers are after a “sappy ending” in your headline, you correctly state the the main reason fans are upset with the endings in your body copy are after more closure. It would be nice if the headline reflected that. You don’t even mention sappy endings anywhere in the article.

    Further to that, it’s not about liking or disliking an unconventional ending but rather having one that makes sense. I’m not sure if you’ve played the previous two games or not, but if you’ve followed the plot points throughout the series, both subtle and distinct, you’d notice that while the majority of the key storylines and themes are able to wrap up nicely in the third (genophage, geth/quarians) the ending to the whole reaper ordeal is completely ambiguous and a disconnect from a very established

    “I like anything that isn’t a typically schlocky Hollywood-style happy ending.” Me too. Red Dead Redemption was a perfect example of doing something different in a successful manner. However, ambiguity is not a substitute for being unconventional.

    “It’s safe to assume the thousands of online complaints represented only a
    small percentage of players. The vast majority either liked the
    ending(s) just fine, or were satisfied with the game overall.” Why is it safe to assume that? Isn’t it just as safe to assume that everyone hated the endings but only a few tens of thousands have actually taken the time to vocalize their frustrations?

    Here’s an excerpt from Pure Sophistry summing up the issue:

    “Mass Effect 3 is a critically acclaimed success no doubt, but Critics,
    and game reviewers are not the ones to be listening to when fan reaction
    is the problem. Metacritic give ME3 91/100 based on critic scores, yet
    user reviews are holding steady at 3.7/10 a HUGE difference. Ratings for
    ME3 on Amazon are at 2/5 stars based on user reviews. Gaming companies
    could survive without critics, but they can’t survive if people wont buy
    their games.

    When thousands of people are giving a game a 2 star rating based on a 10
    minute period in the game you have to realize that there is a problem
    with the game. A lot of the reviews say something along the lines of
    “This was the best Mass Effect game…right until the end. Now there just
    isn’t a point anymore.” When 10 minutes ruins not only a single game but
    an entire series, there is a serious problem.”

    “It’s too early to condemn BioWare’s decision to alter the ending, since
    it’s not yet known if that’s what is planned, but it does look like
    something of this sort is going to happen. If so, it’ll be too bad
    because it’ll set the industry back in its ongoing quest to have its
    products accepted as art.” How will it set the industry back? This would only ring true if you apply the traditional definition of art to video games.

    Like you, I consider video games as an artistic medium. Unlike you, I don’t believe that it should be considered static, which is what sets it apart from things like televisions shows, films, books and paintings. Video games present a completely new way to convey artistic intention and the ability to continually add or alter to that work is one of the key reasons I think people are so drawn to them.

    You claim that the story must remain the same because current technology dictates so. I disagree. We are at a point where through downloadable content and patches, developers can go back and refine, retinker and rethink their stories. If Bioware does in fact end up changing the endings, that would be the first step in the progression of video games as a medium.

    Perhaps I’m just shooting from the hip here, but it seems to be that the media outlets that are coming out with views contrary to the fan outrage over the endings are the ones that gave the game perfect or near perfect scores. That said, is this more about defending your credibility as a legitimate game reviewer or do you truly feel that the ending is the capstone that the series deserved?

  5. Tangerine, spot on.

    The game could have epic with a grim ending. Sadly it was mish mashed and very poorly written.
    It had at least 10 plot holes and seemed as if it was written by someone who hadn’t played the first two and almost the entire 3rd game!

  6. I myself have been a huge fan of the ME series since ME1 but whilst i enjoyed ME3 greatly I did get a feeling of impending doom towards the end. In that sense I was prepared but I must agree with Tangerine – the was a large gap in the narrative at the end in which some plot holes were so large they were bordering on daft – the Normandy end scene to name one….

    On the one hand I do understand how Games can be viewed as art, particularly as a story driven one or action or a combination like Red Dead, however when I played the last example I had no complaints with the bittersweet ending as Red Dead gave me no real choice – which i was fine about. In Mass the game was advertised as my choices would affect the game, for the last 5 minutes or so – however which way I had played (Renegade – Paragon or all round Cpt Kirk) it still didnt matter – it still gave the pretty much the same cutscene – just with different coloured explosions….

    I don’t want a rewrite, but I’d like it in future if developers take a bit more care in rapping up much loved sagas – Indiana Jones and Star Wars to name a few tarnished ones…

    Happy Gaming

  7. I am so tired of people confusing the issue. It’s not the bleak ending we are mad at. It’s the absurdly poor quality of it. The fact that CMDR Shepard was forced to sacrificed his/her life to safe the galaxy isn’t the issue, it’s the gaping plot holes, outright contradictions and virtual similarity of endings. It’s like a bunch of remedial English 9th graders wrote it. It’s not an issue of entitlement, it’s an issue of asking the makers of the game to show some respect to their creation that I am sure they poured so much blood and sweat into.

  8. it wasnt that the story was sad that upset gamers it was that the writing at the end didnt make since the story had so many plot holes in it. its as if they had a completley different writing team that never even played the game for the ending 

    • 1972

      • Awesome, I literally laughed aloud when reading that, sweet. Made my afternoon, though I was born in 82, and I don’t remember really bitching about game content until the 90s. In the 80s my big problem was game freezing or not writing down the correct code to load my saved game! Is that a 0 or an O!?!?

    • Are you even aware as to the crux of the issue here or are you just some guy who decided to wade into a discussion you know nothing about, spout off and then call it a day?

      Either way, kudos for the constructive post. You really brought a new level of depth to the discussion.

  9. Indeed, fans were promised “difficult moral choices that have direct repercussions on the characters and story.” Unfortunately, we get a choice of a blue, red, or green explosion. The numerous other choices the player has made in the game are negated by a non-nonsensical god-did-it ending. Please do your research before you post such tripe.

  10. No one is complaining about the lack of a ‘sappy ending’ (though given the endings they promised us, there most definitely should have been at least one). The title of this article is misleading.

  11. Peter,

    You have completely missed the point. Most fans aren’t’ upset about the tragedy of the ending, but rather the fact it made absolutely no sense. It did not fit with the story. There are so many plot holes it is amazing. Examples, *SPOILER* why are the people who were on earth with my character suddenly all returned to the Normandy? What planet have they crashed on? Wasn’t the Normandy orbiting Earth? The other complaint is that it really doesn’t tie up any loose ends. The tragedy is fine, as long as it makes some damn sense. I actually loved the tragic ending, but it needed to make more logical sense.

    • You are correct sir. I expected Ashley to die, but she’s on the Normandy? Quomodo? I would have also liked a happy ending, the prospects for one kept me going. But it should also be the hardest one to achieve. And as I posted above, the endings are the same as Deus Ex 2. Also, what’s with the whole ending basically being a cut scene? No fight the last 10 minutes?

  12. Oh joy, another borderline moronic article pretty much missing the point.

    The fans don’t care that our one ending was grim. The fans care that there was only one ending. 

    This is an RPG built upon the premise of choice and eventual consequence. It’s not tragic, it’s not dark, it’s not fatalistic, you as the character of Shepard are victorious despite the odds, it’s a game advertised to have a huge range of wildly different endings.

    I’d be perfectly fine just playing through the game normally and receiving a bittersweet finale as a result (even though what he have is needlessly dark and contradicts pretty much everything about the trilogy), but there’s no reason why your character and his allies can’t survive the war, I was expecting that to be an option if you do everything in the game right and to its fullest.

    But no, ambiguity for the purpose of speculation is much better than giving people what they want.  

  13. “Fans were generally upset that the science-fiction trilogy ended on a bittersweet note…”

    No.
    No, they weren’t.

    Do a little more research before you commit anything to writing.

  14. Because it had a ending full of Plotholes

    Oh and they were going to continue the game anyway with DLC regardless if people complained or not.

  15. Most gamers will agree that the choices made throughout the series din’t mean much at all in the end, there wasn’t any level of depth or attention paid to towards the ending, the complexity of choices came down to which colour explosions did you want the mass effect universe to end in… it was quite disconnected and meaningless that wants to make you skip everything and not play it differently again since it wont have any effect.

  16. what a load of rubish Mass Effect 3 is one if not the best ending of a trilagy game of all time the resone that some  and i mean a veary small amount of gamers gant get thare head round the ending is becouse thay moast likeley thay havent done it right bioware told the gamers that what you did in the game would efect the outcome try to finish a game properly before harasing the company that made it and demanding some thing for nothing becouse you ar not happy about the ending  after all its not your story or idea so if your so upset dont buy it  and stop whining about what is not yours becouse you think you have a right to tell other peple how to write thare story or run there company just get a grip and grow up.

  17. It’s not people that ending was “not sappy” it’s that the ending felt incomplete, made no sense what’s so ever, was full of plot hole’s and left one with a sense of utter hopelessness.That’s why people are complaining about the ending. It was rushed and after people have invested in a series they deserve more than to have a grim-dark hipster ending tacked on at the in in order to  “polarise people”.

  18. @font-face {
    font-family: “MS 明朝”;
    }@font-face {
    font-family: “MS 明朝”;
    }@font-face {
    font-family: “Cambria”;
    }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: Cambria; }.MsoChpDefault { font-family: Cambria; }div.WordSection1 { page: WordSection1; }

    er’ it’s not because it has a
    “sad” ending . . . it’s because it is full of plot holes, rushed, is
    counter to all 3 games, and does not include what their own marketing and
    writers told fans (ie. Everything you have done in ME1-ME3 matter), etc . . .

     

    We understand the endings, we have seen
    them before in other games . . . that is not the problem . . . the problem is that
    they, in no shape or form, fit into the lore of ME or make any even baseline logic.
    The game takes a 180 with 10min left. I can’t believe you played the same game.
    Heh, the endings has lots of holes . . . everything from your squad ending up
    on your ship that is running away when they were dead — to the start of the explosions
    of the Mass Relays starting in the wrong system (Yeah, take a look at the map).
    It’s just sloppy and insulting to anyone who pays attention to the writing of a
    narrative.

  19. er’ it’s not because it has a “sad” ending . . . it’s because it is full of plot holes, rushed, is counter to all 3 games, and does not include what their own marketing and writers told fans (ie. Everything you have done in ME1-ME3 matter), etc . . .

    We understand the endings, we have seen them before in other games . . . that is not the problem, the problem is that they, in no shape or form, fit into the lore of ME or make any even baseline logic. The game takes a 180 with 10min left. I can’t believe you played the same game. Heh, the endings has lots of holes . . . everything from your squad ending up on your ship that is running away when they were dead — to the start of the explosions of the Mass Relays starting in the wrong system (Yeah, take a look at the map). It’s just sloppy and insulting to anyone who pays attention to the writing of a narrative. 

  20. I have not played the game all the way through yet. But I do have one point to make, Bioware makes games, they are to be sold to the public, it is the public who buy them, paying their salaries and increasing their profits.  It is literally a democratic business. So if your customer base tells you that you miffed, you do what you can to mend it.  Otherwise its bankcruptcy and the dole cue for your employees.  Mass Effect is in my opinion the best series of its type.  If bioware missed the ball on the ending they amend it.  But they have to charge for it.  The customers want it so they pay for it. Supply and demand.

  21. Mr Nowak:

    I’m glad you enjoyed the ending, and I respect that you didn’t write about it without having first experienced it. The need to review games on a launch-date deadline is a structural weakness in the game reporting industry, given that an average closed-ended AAA title will take anywhere from ten to eighty hours to properly complete.

    That being said, you could not possibly have gotten the nature of the Mass Effect 3 backlash more wrong. For someone to take games seriously enough to have finished ME3 twice, it’s a real puzzle to me how you can report on this issue without having done any serious research on the complaints.

    I didn’t want my Shepard to end the game riding off into the sunset on a rainbow unicorn with all of his friends. To suggest the problem is “no sappy ending” is flat-out disrespectful if you understand the points of issue here, and unacceptably lazy if you don’t.

    Would I have rejected a happy ending? Of course not. But I went into this game expecting that a dark ending was at least likely, as did anyone with any previous experience playing the series. I would have been fine with a well-crafted negative ending, but what I got was a mess — a sudden and total inversion of the main character’s nature, a last-minute reveal of a God Behind the Curtain story mechanic that had nothing to do with anything the series had previously established, a bewildering and nonsensical montage, and one five-second scene to explain the consequences of the Door A / Door B / Door C decision that was to be the culmination of a hundred or more hours of gameplay. The story didn’t even end. It just stopped.

    Mass Effect 3 is 98% of an excellent game, and normally that would be cause for celebration. But when the ending is so badly handled — and it seems to have been handled almost aggressively badly, to such a mindboggling degree that fans who have been following the franchise now feel betrayed for letting themselves take it seriously in the first place — then it sours the entire experience so much that people end up regretting their attachment to the story and the characters in the first place. They feel they’ve been fooled and fleeced.

    Bioware has a once-strong, but recently wobbly, reputation for high quality in their games. They have built up a tremendous amount of goodwill currency in the gaming community, and what they did with the ending of ME3 was such a profoundly misguided reading of what had made the game so popular — on every relevant level, from coherent storytelling to player involvement to moral complexity — that their goodwill account has dropped precipitously. And since word-of-mouth is still a huge factor in new game sales, Bioware seems to be recognizing — belatedly, unfortunately — how much damage they have done to their marquee franchise by insulting the intelligence of their clientele.

    And if all of that just seems like precious posturing to you, there’s this: Bioware spent ample resources marketing this game as:
    – “a completion of the story…” — which it wasn’t, by any but the most generous and uninvested definition
    – “…featuring a rich synthesis of many of the previous decisions the player had made over the three games…” — which it absolutely did not, on any level
    – “…to produce a variety of possible endings that would cap each player’s experience in a personally-meaningful way.” — which turned out to be three cookie-cutter endings with slight differences that only hold any relevance if the consumer is then willing to get the “real ending” later — probably at additional cost.

    This story has so many available resources, and you seem to have disregarded all of them.

  22. sorry, but that ending just had to many plot holes to make sense. It got rushed near the end! which was a let down because the game as a whole deserves 9.5/10 only the 0.5 is lost due to the ending. + Why would joker run away from a possible dying Shepard!

  23. It’s not that it was a bittersweet ending or a sad ending… its the fact that the ending makes no sense with the rest of the games! It’s one huge plot hole that is brought up in the last 10 mins and makes anything you’ve done in all of the games worthless and meaningless. It is if Bioware is just spitting in your face for being a fan and buying all three games…

  24. You write for macleans and your reviewing games? lol, right, we’ll stick to those actually qualified to have an opinion.

  25. I’m just upset that the game didn’t really end.  What happened is that an indoctrinated Shepard had a climatic moment in which she/he decided the fate of things to come, but then… nothing.   We don’t even get to see a conclusion to the climax let alone the actual story.  There’s no falling action… nothing.   We didn’t get an ending and Bioware/EA expects to sell it to us after advertising that it was already in the game.  

    This isn’t about fans trying to rewrite the ending or attempting to change the artistic merit of EA/Bioware.  It’s about fans wanting what they paid for.  You journalists would do well to get that right.  It’s not an argument about the ownership of a creative license as much as it is the expectation of a commission be completed by the artist being commissioned.  

  26. “…it requires players to make difficult moral choices that have direct repercussions on the characters and story.” 
    Really? i dont believe you played the game at ALL if you had you would KNOW that your choices that affect the whole UNIVERSE (e.g. letting the Rachni live, curing the genophage, making peace between the geth and quarians etc…) have NO “effect” on the ending! Its absurd! How can you say that a game with that many plot holes in the ending is satisfactory? How can you say that a game who reused the SAME 3 endings (just in different colors) is perfect? What about the story writing? 

    In Mass Effect 2’s dlc “Arrival” Bioware makes it PERFECTLY clear that if a relay is DESTROYED that it WILL destroy the entire system that its in. You state you played the games, so you DO know that there was one in the Sol System (where earth is) correct? So the same ending depicts Shepard destroying how many systems? Committing more genocide then the Reapers who only kill advanced life… Not to mention BLOWING UP EARTH!!!!!!! It is hilarious that people are satisfied with 3 endings that are basically the SAME. What happened to Bioware’s promise about our decisions actually having an “Effect” on the ending (hence the game title “Mass Effect.” Come on people think its ridiculous anyone would be satisfied with an ending a 4th grader could write (yes that was sarcasm)!

  27. “In any regard, the studio is placing commerce above art.” Do you seriously believe that art EVER comes before commerce in a mass-marketed video game? Come now.

    Besides, the issue with ME3’s ending is more about a lapse in quality than any petty pouting about not getting a happy ending. ME3 customers have reiterated this time and time again, only to see the next piece published with the same misconception. Consumers just wanted an ending that actually made sense within the narrative context of the story. If the gaming media want the public to consider their work to be art, they should understand that the consumer has reasonable expectations of consistent quality.

    The storytelling in the Mass Effect series was never going to win a Nebula award, but, until the last 10 minutes of ME3 blew a gaping hole in the fabric of the Mass Effect universe, players could at least manage to suspend disbelief.

  28. This Article completely misses the point. The fans are not dismayed because its a a sad ending, they’re upset because:1) the ending doesn’t make sense in the context of the previous 2 games, 2) it is wrot with plot holes that break emersion, and 3) takes not account of the “important choices you’ve made thus far in the series.
    For a better article on the ending:

    http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=15395


  29. In the case of Mass Effect 3, which shipped 3.5 million copies for launch, it’s safe to assume the thousands of online complaints represented only a small percentage of players. The vast majority either liked the ending(s) just fine, or were satisfied with the game overall.”

    A small percentage? Are you kidding me? The vast majority liked it? This is the most misleading statement I’ve read since I can remember. It is simply unbelievable how so many dismiss the backlash as only coming from “a small percentage” of the players, just because the complaints are online.

  30. It’s shameful how misinformed you are.
    This is what happens when idiots try to write articles.

  31. If you actually played the you’d realize that the ending MAKES NOSENSE. I’d be fine with a downbeat ending but have it MAKE SENSE.

  32. game*

  33. Bioware published a book called Mass Effect Deception.  The book was so full of plot errors and holes that people called them on it.  They said they will fix it.  No one said this was wrong.  There is no difference here.  The ending is so full of plot errors and holes, doesn’t make sense and gives no closure.  Also the marketing campaign for ME3 was built on “there will be closure” and “take back Earth” which proved incorrect.  However the damage has been done now so people are asking for tons more besides having the ending fixed they want it completely rewritten.

  34. You seem to misunderstand the context behind why the ending is a “bad” ending. Not because it’s not a happy ending but rather it was poorly constructed and riddled with plot holes.

    I don’t know how writers can miss this critical aspect. Having a poorly constructed ending is not a emotional/sorrowful ending rather an insulting attack on our wallets.

    Funny how you missed on the Dragon Age 2 backlash and admission from Bioware on the various defects and how Dragon Age is heading in a different direction (One would hope).

  35. How about the backlash also being that the endings to ME3 are the same as for Deus Ex: Invisible War?

  36. You completely missed the point with this article.  The problem is not that there is no happy ending. The problem is that the ending is nonsensical, introducing a giant plot hole as a part of an arguably lazy deus ex machina–a plot hole which contradicts the internal laws of the universe that Bioware has developed over the last however-many years.

    And it’s not “a small percentage of players.”  It’s a fairly large, fairly vocal portion of repeat customers–which, unless they do things differently in Canada, is the type of customers most businesses prefer.  If they alienate that consumer base, they’re going to lose a significant amount of business when they release Dragon Age 3 or whatever’s next in the pipe.

    EA/Bioware released a broken product, and they need to patch it.  Though–and it pains me to say this–I’d be willing to throw ten dollars at them just to make the ending go away.  It’s god-awful.

  37. I don’t need sappy. I need coherent.

  38. Yet another article proving that the majority of media that covers gaming is out of touch with fans.  Again, most are just using canned logic such as “its art, it shouldn’t be changed” and “fans didn’t get the disney ending they wanted.”  I just really wish that these journalists would actually do a good job representing their point.  BTW here is a article that does a good job breaking down all the reasons people have hard feelings about ending.  It would be nice to see a well thought out article from the opposite part of view instead of opinions being touted as fact.

     http://jmstevenson.wordpress.com/2012/03/22/all-that-matters-is-the-ending-part-2-mass-effect-3/

Sign in to comment.