Emma Teitel

Emma Teitel is a National Magazine Award-winning columnist who writes frequently about women’s issues and popular culture. She gets a lot of hate mail, mostly from Burnaby, British Columbia.
Emma Teitel
Television

Emma Teitel on diversity in kids’ TV

Excess of choice does not mean complexity of choice
Emma Teitel
Ottawa

Joe Oliver and the uncool tyranny of the Old Boy Elite

Old Boys still wield power. But as proven by the Finance Minister’s kiboshed Q&A at the Cambridge Club, it’s easy to lampoon.
Steve Silberman delivers a speech at a Ted Talk.  Still from YouTube
Science

Steve Silberman on autism and ’neurodiversity’

A Q&A with an author about neurodiversity: the radically humane idea that people process the world in different ways, and there’s nothing wrong with that
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Life

A line in the sand for on-the-job harrassment

Emma Teitel on a CBC reporter’s response to an unwanted kiss, and why it isn’t a case of political correctness run rampant
Ian Black
Society

The real lesson from Uber: Don’t be a jerk

Emma Teitel on what happens when a business rates its customers
Washington Redskins v Arizona Cardinals
World

Emma Teitel’s advice for gropers, and also pro football teams

The big ethical blind spot in defences of the Washington Redskins’ name is the fact that pride is nothing compared to pain
Emma Teitel
Society

This column is guaranteed 100% gay

Emma Teitel on why America’s Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage is still important in Canada—and to her, personally
Emma Teitel
Society

Here’s the thing about free speech: It’s not absolute.

The misconception that freedom of speech is absolute is most prevalent on the Internet, writes Emma Teitel
Film-Review Inside Out
Movies

How ’Inside Out’ turns kids’ movies on their head

Friendship in the face of evil is the key to most children’s films. But Pixar’s ’Inside Out’ ignores the formula—to huge success
Emma Teitel
Society

Go ahead. ’Go gay’ for Ruby Rose.

The mania for Ruby Rose on ’Orange Is the New Black’ has sparked an odd backlash, writes Emma Teitel