The Nerve of Karl Rove - Macleans.ca

The Nerve of Karl Rove

by

In recent days, former Bush advisor, Karl Rove, has begun a campaign to denigrate the candidacy of Barack Obama. He has attempted to describe Obama as arrogant, self-centered, self-righteous, and devoid of any principle. The objective is to portray Obama as the choice of the liberal media and a candidate of privilege. It is ironic that Rove benefited from the fact his own candidate, George W. Bush, was very much a child of privilege and proved to be, more often than not, arrogant and self righteous in his term of office.

In a book entitled Rove Exposed, we were introduced to his style of politics. It is one of character assassination, distortion of the truth, and fabrication of false issues. Adversaries of Rove know full well the price of being his opponent, while even those on his side know better than to contradict the supposed ‘architect of electoral success’. Granted, he has been a successful political operative, but his name will enter the annals of political history for his ability to manipulate and distort. One need only remember the Swift Boat commercials used to question Senator John Kerry’s decorated military service. There is no direct evidence of Rove’s involvement, but no one doubts that it has all the marks of his style of politics.

Now that George W. Bush is in the last months of his administration, we find out that Karl Rove may have lied in the Valerie Plaine affair and contributed to the full scale fabrication of the case to invade Iraq. Over 4000 Americans have died in Iraq. This, in addition to running campaigns for quite possibly the least curious and most questionably competent President in recent memory, is what makes Rove’s attempt to bring down Obama so ironic. The more Rove speaks, the more he reminds us that McCain could be the extension of the Bush administration. This blog still regards McCain as an agent of change and a respectable opponent, but with friends like Rove, one may have to wonder. One has to admit this guy has got nerve.