Elizabeth May interjects: 'Sorry, Mr. Harper. Fact check.' - Macleans.ca

Elizabeth May interjects: ‘Sorry, Mr. Harper. Fact check.’

Green Leader fires digital salvos in the campaign debate on the economy

by
Green Party Leader Elizabeth May arrives at a campaign event where she released the party's platform in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday September 9, 2015. A federal election will be held October 19. (DARRYL DYCK/CP)

Green Party Leader Elizabeth May arrives at a campaign event where she released the party’s platform in Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday September 9, 2015. A federal election will be held October 19. (DARRYL DYCK/CP)

OTTAWA — There were three podiums on the stage for Thursday’s federal leaders’ debate on the economy, but it was the one Elizabeth May set up on Twitter that captured most of the social media attention.

The Green party leader used Twitter videos to rebut various talking points throughout the debate — and data provided by the social networking site suggested her talking points got the most people talking.

May’s videos on trade, jobs and carbon pricing were the most retweeted messages at the halfway mark of a debate that also touched on immigration, housing, infrastructure and general economic vision.

Whether the debate changed any minds remains to be seen, but it generated more online interest in May overall — Twitter says she earned 5,000 new followers.

While May drove Twitter traffic, Google said the most Googled debater was Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, narrowly edging out Conservative rival Stephen Harper.

Debate-watchers were also tweeting for fun Thursday: more than 1,000 tweets mentioned the intrusive bell that was used to signal the end of a session.

We kept track of May’s comments during the debate just below:

    ‘Let’s talk about carbon pricing.’

    ‘We will reduce emissions.’

    ‘Sorry, Mr. Harper. Fact check.’

    ‘Here is our infrastructure plan’

    ‘We need a predictable path to citizenship.’

    ‘Our refugee system is broken.’

    ‘We need to pierce the housing bubble.’

    ‘We need a guaranteed annual income.’

    ‘Time to resurrect dead money.’

    ‘Bill C-51 makes us more vulnerable.’

    ‘Let’s talk about productivity.’

    ‘There’s only one person on this stage …’

    ‘This debate touched on climate, but …

    ‘Student debt is a problem.’

    ‘Oh. I do need another fact check.’

    ‘This may not be the focused debate …’

    ‘Let’s talk about Harper’s trade record.’

    ‘Missing? Women’s Issues.’

    ‘How PM Harper balanced the budget.’

    ‘They sure left out some issues.’