Maclean's on the Hill: Assisted dying, opioid crisis, LGBT apology - Macleans.ca

Maclean’s on the Hill: Assisted dying, opioid crisis, LGBT apology

Catch up on a week of political headlines from Parliament Hill with our Ottawa bureau’s weekly podcast

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Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. This week, an opioid crisis. Lawmakers and healthcare professionals gathered in Ottawa to find a strategy to deal with a disturbing rise in overdose deaths in Canada. Health Minister Jane Philpott joins the show to speak about what government can do—and whether or not she will declare a national public health emergency.

It appears Canada’s new assisted-dying law is confusing both doctors and patients, to the point where some are still leaving the country to seek medical help in dying. We hear from a family that was stuck in that position, as Maclean’s associate editor Shannon Proudfoot explains the problems with a vague section of the law.

This week Prime Minister Justin Trudeau named Liberal MP Randy Boissonnault as a special adviser on LGBTQ2 issues. Boissonnault joins us to discuss one of his first priorities: working towards a formal apology to the community for decades of institutional and social discrimination.

Finally, Maclean’s honoured some of the best of the best in the House of Commons with our annual Parliamentarians of the Year Awards. We’ll speak with some of the MPs who took home the hardware, and chat with the winner of the ceremony’s lifetime achievement award.

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The full episode


Part 1. Ottawa confronts Canada’s opioid crisis

Fentanyl pills are shown in a handout photo. Police say organized crime groups have been sending a potentially deadly drug through British Columbia to Alberta and Saskatchewan using hidden compartments in vehicles. (Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams/CP)

Fentanyl pills are shown in a handout photo. Police say organized crime groups have been sending a potentially deadly drug through British Columbia to Alberta and Saskatchewan using hidden compartments in vehicles. (Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams/CP)

Lawmakers and healthcare professionals gathered in Ottawa this week to find a strategy to deal with a disturbing rise in overdose deaths in Canada. Health Minister Jane Philpott joins the show to speak about what government can do—and whether or not she will declare a national public health emergency.


Part 2. Canada’s assisted dying law sows confusion

Julia Lamb, who has a degenerative muscle disease, pauses following a news conference in Vancouver, B.C., Monday, June, 27, 2016. Lamb is challenging Canada's physician-assisted dying law just days after it came into force. (Jonathan Hayward/CP)

Julia Lamb, who has a degenerative muscle disease, pauses following a news conference in Vancouver, B.C., Monday, June, 27, 2016. Lamb is challenging Canada’s physician-assisted dying law just days after it came into force. (Jonathan Hayward/CP)

It appears Canada’s new assisted-dying law is confusing both doctors and patients, to the point where some are still leaving the country to seek medical help in dying. We hear from a family that was stuck in that position, as Maclean’s associate editor Shannon Proudfoot explains the problems with a vague section of the law.

RELATED: Finding death, when the assisted dying law leaves you out


Part 3. Liberals consider LGBTQ2 apology

CANADA, Montreal: Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau takes part in Montreal's Pride Parade on August 14, 2016. The parade took place on Rene-Levesque st. A minute of silence was observed in memory of Orlando's shooting victims. (Cristian Mijea/CP)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau takes part in Montreal’s Pride Parade on August 14, 2016. (Cristian Mijea/CP)

This week Prime Minister Justin Trudeau named Liberal MP Randy Boissonnault as a special adviser on LGBTQ2 issues. Boissonnault joins us to discuss one of his first priorities: working towards a formal apology to the community for decades of institutional and social discrimination.


Part 4. Maclean’s honours the Parliamentarians of the Year!

Ed Broadbent, photographed at his Ottawa home November, 2016, will be receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award at the annual Maclean's Magazine Parliamentarian of the Year Awards later this month. (Photograph by Blair Gable)

Ed Broadbent, photographed at his Ottawa home November 2016. (Photograph by Blair Gable)

Maclean’s honoured some of the best of the best in the House of Commons with our annual Parliamentarians of the Year Awards. We’ll speak with some of the MPs who took home the hardware, and chat with the winner of the ceremony’s lifetime achievement award.


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