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Maclean’s on the Hill: Could Ottawa blow a Supreme Court deadline?

The Maclean’s Ottawa bureau gives your weekly audio briefing on all things #cdnpoli


 

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Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. This week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau toured the destruction in Fort McMurray and announced new employment insurance help for regions hit hard by wildfires. Cormac spoke with Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr, the chair of a new cabinet committee handling the response to the wildfires in northern Alberta.

The federal government has taken the first step in fundamentally changing the way we vote in federal elections. The Liberals announced a committee that will study options for electoral reform, including proportional representation and ranked ballots. We speak with an expert who’s critical of the Liberal road map to reform.

The controversial assisted dying bill is expected to pass through the House of Commons in a matter of days. But it appears the Senate is poised to pose fundamental amendments to the legislation. We speak with Conservative Sen. Bob Runciman, the chair of the Senate committee that’s studying the bill, about potential amendments—and the prospect that legislators could miss the Supreme Court’s deadline.

Should the spouse of the Prime Minister be allowed to have more than one taxpayer-funded assistant? Sophie Grégoire Trudeau’s suggestion that she may need more staff to deal with demands on her time has sparked a debate on Parliament Hill. We look more deeply at the controversy with a professor who specializes in gender and politics.

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The full episode



Part 1. Kent Hehr on Liberal plans to help Fort McMurray

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sits with local MP David Yrudiga (left), Minister of Infrastructure and Communities Amarjeet Sohi (back middle) and Grand Chief Steve Courtoreille during a tour of the devastation in Fort McMurray. (Adam Scotti/PMO)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sits with local MP David Yrudiga (left), Minister of Infrastructure and Communities Amarjeet Sohi (back middle) and Grand Chief Steve Courtoreille during a tour of the devastation in Fort McMurray. (Adam Scotti/PMO)

This week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau toured the destruction in Fort McMurray and announced new employment insurance help for regions hit hard by wildfires. Cormac Mac Sweeney spoke with Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr, the chair of a new cabinet committee handling the response to the wildfires in northern Alberta.



Part 2. Electoral reform is coming to Ottawa

Democratic Institutions Minister Maryam Monsef is applauded by her party as she responds to a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, May 11, 2016. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

Democratic Institutions Minister Maryam Monsef is applauded by her party as she responds to a question during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday, May 11, 2016. (Sean Kilpatrick/CP)

The federal government has taken the first step in fundamentally changing the way we vote in federal elections. The Liberals announced a committee that will study options for electoral reform, including proportional representation and ranked ballots. We speak with an expert who’s critical of the Liberal road map to reform.



Part 3. Could Ottawa miss a Supreme Court deadline?

The Supreme Court of Canada building is pictured, in Ottawa, on October 15, 2014. The Trudeau government appears to be in no hurry to grapple with the explosive issue of doctor-assisted dying, even as it prepares to urge the Supreme Court next week to give it more time to craft a new law on the matter. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The Supreme Court of Canada building is pictured, in Ottawa, on October 15, 2014. The Trudeau government appears to be in no hurry to grapple with the explosive issue of doctor-assisted dying, even as it prepares to urge the Supreme Court next week to give it more time to craft a new law on the matter. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

The controversial assisted dying bill is expected to pass through the House of Commons in a matter of days. But it appears the Senate is poised to pose fundamental amendments to the legislation. We speak with Conservative Sen. Bob Runciman, the chair of the Senate committee that’s studying the bill, about potential amendments—and the prospect that legislators could miss the Supreme Court’s deadline.



Part 4. What do we expect of a prime minister’s spouse?

Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, wife of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, holds their son Hadrien Grégoire while she greets students from D.C.'s Patterson Elementary School, after arriving at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Wednesday, March 9, 2016. (Cliff Owen/AP)

Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, wife of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, holds their son Hadrien Grégoire while she greets students from D.C.’s Patterson Elementary School, after arriving at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Wednesday, March 9, 2016. (Cliff Owen/AP)

Should the spouse of the Prime Minister be allowed to have more than one taxpayer-funded assistant? Sophie Grégoire Trudeau’s suggestion that she may need more staff to deal with demands on her time has sparked a debate on Parliament Hill. We look more deeply at the controversy with a professor who specializes in gender and politics.


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Maclean’s on the Hill: Could Ottawa blow a Supreme Court deadline?

  1. This onslaught from the conservatives and their entourage like Ezra and his megaphone, and even the dippers pile on is a sign of 2 things, first the more they pile on, it drives the Trudeau’s real estate value through the roof, and number two, the grits are driving both the opposition parties nuts, and that’s a good thing(sunny ways, sunny ways), and the media loves juicy smear jobs to push their own agenda, Rosie Barton(P&P) goes all APO at the liberals with her tough questions(she needs a valium), even though she doesn’t go after the other 2 parties the same way. The cons need to come to terms with the fact that they are no longer in government, and I know it has to be devastating for them I’m sure(you reap what you sew), and the dippers need to dump Tom ASAP, or if not, they could end up in the political wilderness for at least the next 10 years, or even worse, they could even be wiped off the political map in 2020. If Trudeau stays center left and keeps his nose clean, that could mean the grits won’t even have to worry about electoral reform, just suck up as much of the left as they can, and don’t move off the center, in order to keep the cons from getting at some of the red tory base. I’ve always said, a PM is a man or a women with a good character, authenticity, compassion, and understanding of how to balance our country from all 3 coasts(Trudeau hasn’t been the furthest east of Canada yet, St John’s, since elected), can wheel power for many years, and we have one of them now, so if the opposition have any thoughts of removing Trudeau, they need to find a new play book, because shooting blanks like going after the wife with all these smear campaigns instead of telling people of the country what your going do different than the grits, I tell you, your fighting a loosing battle. The summer is coming now, and I guess if the opposition doesn’t do something to get attention before then, Canadians won’t even know their is an opposition by the next sitting in the fall.

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