99 reasons why it’s better to be Canadian

Our sixth annual Canada Day survey

(Chris Wattie/Reuters)

It can be hard living next to history’s greatest cultural, military and economic superpower. But that doesn’t mean the United States is best at everything. As Canada celebrates its 146th birthday we dig into the numbers to find some of the many ways Canada is better off–from sports and sex to politics and entertainment.

Life & well-being

1. We live longer: Canadians born today will live an average of three years longer than Americans (81 years in Canada versus 78.7 south of the border). Not only that, the gap between life expectancy in the two countries is widening with each passing decade—it was less than a year in the late 1970s.

2. We’re more satisfied with our lives: According to the Better Life Index, an international quality of life comparison by the OECD each year, Canadians enjoy a higher level of life satisfaction than Americans, scoring 7.4 out of 10, versus 7.0 in the U.S.

3. Saying “Sorry” is good for you: Canadians are mocked for always apologizing, but it’s not a character flaw. Saying sorry has been found to boost happiness and strengthen relationships. Researchers at the University of Waterloo even found apologizing to a cop when pulled over for speeding can get fines reduced an average of $51. True, scientists did recently claim that refusing to apologize for your actions leads to a sense of empowerment, but such short-sighted thinking would only appeal to self-centred Americans. (Sorry, that was mean.)

4. Our kids are all right: Canada’s schools take heat from all sides, but they must be doing something right. Our 15-year-olds routinely score in the top 10 of 65 countries that participate in the OECD’s reading, math and science tests. Last time around, in 2009, we were sixth, just behind Singapore and ahead of New Zealand. American teens? A lukewarm 17th. Ouch.

There’s more: (5) We have a lower rate of suicide (11.1 per 100,000 people, versus 12 in the U.S.), (6) a lower rate of infant mortality (5.1 per 1,000 live births, versus 6.1 in the U.S.), (7) and our health care costs per person are much lower (US$4,445 per capita in Canada, versus $8,233 in the U.S.). (8) New parents who work are better off (maternity-parental leave in Canada is 50 weeks, versus just 12 unpaid weeks in the U.S.). (9) More of our marriages last: For every 1,000 population in the U.S., 3.6 marriages end in divorce annually, compared to 2.1 in Canada. (10) Poor kids are more likely to attend university or college here: By age 19 to 21 roughly 54 per cent of Canadian youth from low-income families are enrolled in post-secondary education, compared to just 30 per cent of the poorest youth in America. (11) We’re less prudish: An Angus Reid poll found 83 per cent of Canadians believe sex between an unmarried man and woman is acceptable, versus just 59 per cent of Americans.

12. We’re better educated: 48.3 per cent of Canadians have a post-secondary degree, compared to 40.3 per cent in the U.S.

13. We’re fitter: The percentage of American adults who are obese is 35.9. In Canada, it’s 24.2.

14.  We have more sex: According to a survey by condom-maker Durex, 59 per cent of Canadians say they have sex weekly, versus 53 per cent of Americans.

15. We drink less: Our alcohol consumption is 8.2 litres a year, compared to 8.7 in the U.S.

16. We’re richer: Canada’s average household net worth of $363,000 is higher than America’s, at $320,000.

17. We accept homosexuality: 80 per cent of Canadians say society should accept gays and lesbians, versus 60 per cent in the U.S.

18. More of us give to charities: Roughly 64 per cent of Canadians donate money to charities, compared to 60 per cent in the U.S.

19. We have better work-life balance: More than 11 per cent of U.S. employees regularly clock 50-hour workweeks, compared to 3.9 per cent here.

20. We brave the cold better: Our climate is colder and our population smaller, but relatively fewer of us succumb to the cold. Where Canada has 5,644 excess winter deaths (relative to average non-winter deaths), the U.S. sees 108,500.

21. We live in bigger houses: We have 2.6 rooms per person in Canada, versus 2.3 in the U.S.

Money & work

22. Canada has greater economic freedom: So says the U.S.-based Heritage Foundation Index of Economic Freedom. Canada scores 6th place, while America comes in 10th. Credit our sounder public finances.

23. We have less income disparity: While the gap between rich and poor has become more marked in both countries, it’s more like a canyon in the U.S. Between 1966 and 2011, the average inflation-adjusted income of the bottom 90 per cent of American workers grew by a negligible $59. Meanwhile, the income of the top 10 per cent of workers soared by $116,071. Among OECD countries ranked for worst income disparity, the U.S takes fourth place, behind only Chile, Mexico and Turkey. Canada comes in 12th out of 34 nations.

24. Our young workers are doing better: Yes, Canada has a lower unemployment rate than the U.S., but while the overall gap is narrowing, young workers here are more likely to find work. Canada’s youth unemployment rate is 13.5 per cent, compared to 16.8 per cent in the States.

25. Our banks are better: Earlier this year Bloomberg ranked the world’s strongest banks. Four of the top 10 were Canadian, and all scored higher than the top U.S. bank, Citigroup, which came in 9th.

26. We have more social mobility: If you want to live the American Dream, move to Canada. Social mobility, measured by intergenerational changes in income between sons and their fathers, is twice as high in Canada as in the U.S. In other words, a son born to a poor father in the U.S. is twice as likely to remain poor throughout his life than had he been born in Canada.

27. The money in your wallet is safer: Canadian currency once had a terrible reputation for being easy to counterfeit, but new polymer bills introduced by the Bank of Canada have hi-tech features that make them almost impossible to reproduce. Of the 500 million notes circulated since 2011, only 56 fakes have been seized. In the U.S., out of every one million bank notes in circulation, an estimated average of 6.5 are fakes.

There’s more: (28) Our corporate taxes are lower (PricewaterhouseCoopers ranks Canada 8th out of 185 countries for its advantageous corporate tax structure while the U.S. is 69th). (29) We embrace transit: Seven of the 10 North American cities with the most people taking transit to work are in Canada. (30) We get more paid holidays: America has no mandated paid holidays or vacation time, so 23 per cent of U.S. workers get no paid time off, compared to Canadian workers who get at least two weeks and nine paid public holidays. (31) More women work here: For most of the past 40 years more American women have been in the labour market than in Canada, but after 2000 that changed—62 per cent of Canadian women are in the labour market, compared to 57 per cent in the U.S. (32) More of our immigrants strike it rich: In both the U.S. and Canada the majority of millionaires are self-made, but a larger number in Canada are immigrants, according to a BMO study—in Canada nearly half of millionaires are immigrants or second-generation residents, compared to just one-third in America.

Arts & entertainment

33. The biggest summer movies of 2013 have Canadian DNA: Aside from the Canadian-packed comedy This is the End, Guillermo del Toro’s Pacific Rim was filmed in Toronto. The Wolverine features everyone’s favourite mutant Canuck. Kick-Ass 2 features the dark return of Jim Carrey of Newmarket, Ont. And really, Star Trek Into Darkness would be just a glimmer in J.J. Abrams’s eye if it weren’t for William Shatner, native of Côte Saint-Luc, Que.

34. Our opera house is tops: There’s no city in North America with an opera house to compare to the Four Seasons Centre in Toronto. Jack Diamond, who built it, was promptly handpicked by Valery Gergiev to build the new Mariinsky II theatre in St. Petersburg, Russia.

35. The best small-screen sci-fi is secretly Canadian: Revolution may be keeping on the lights at NBC and The Walking Dead may be an American creation, but the best small-screen science fiction—the series that thrill both critics and audiences—are secretly Canadian. Continuum, Lost Girl, Haven and Orphan Black are all capturing both record ratings and critics’ notoriously fickle hearts—and all are filmed here, funded by our networks and starring a host of talented Canadian actors (albeit some of whom are masked in layers of monster makeup).

36. Our broadcast TV doesn’t have to treat adults like children: Maybe it’s because Americans are such sensitive folk, or it’s our ill-defined role as cultural bridge between the U.S. and Europe, but Canadian TV regularly gets away with showing things broadcast networks south of the border can’t: nipples, F-bombs and the like. When The Sopranos aired unedited on CTV, executive producer David Chase said that could never happen on U.S. network TV: “It’s just not possible, we have rules against that.”

37. We’re funnier: Hollywood and American network television have known it for decades. Wayne and Shuster, Lorne Michaels, Catherine O’Hara, John Candy, Mike Myers, Jim Carrey—all examples of our comedy supremacy. And a new generation of Canadian comics is keeping the tradition alive. Vancouver slacker Seth Rogen has become one of Hollywood’s most bankable comedians, along with Brampton, Ont.’s Michael Cera and Montreal’s Jay Baruchel (all three star in this summer’s apocalyptic comedy This is the End).

38. We’re better at special effects: While demand for blockbuster visual effects in movies skyrockets, California’s special effects industry is collapsing. Why? They can’t keep up with Canada (or Britain or Asia or New Zealand, but that’s beside the point). In Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal and Winnipeg, visual effects artists have been taking over the design of explosions, gore and CGI monsters as our technical schools pump out skilled graduates, and movie studios outsource to take advantage of Canada’s generous tax breaks.

39. Hollywood is taking advice from . . . Quebec? Not content with ripping off their own ideas, Hollywood is now so desperate for fresh-ish material that it’s turning to the biggest and brightest Quebec auteurs for help. Montrealer Ken Scott is currently remaking his 2011 Québécois hit Starbuck, this time called Delivery Man and starring Vince Vaughn. Scott is so in demand that he was originally hired to direct the English-language remake of Jean-François Pouliot’s comedy La grande séduction, now being filmed by fellow Canadian Don McKellar, and starring B.C. native Taylor Kitsch.

There’s more: (40) Canadian musicians rule the charts: Michael Bublé, Justin Bieber, Carly Rae Jepsen—and those are just the mildly tolerable pop stars Canada has produced recently. This year will also see releases from Arcade Fire, the Weakerthans and the reunited critical darlings, Death from Above 1979. (41) Our filmmakers are wilder: David Lynch, eat your heart out. Canadian movies are wilder and weirder–necrophilia in Kissed, David Cronenberg’s car-crash fetishism and twin gynecologists, and Atom Egoyan’s films about father-daughter incest, a schoolgirl stripper, and a wife who hires a young hooker to test her husband. (42) Our filmmakers are more worldly, too: Unlike Americans, who wait for the rest of the world to learn English, Canadians get Oscar nominations for foreign-language films, and not just ones in French—Deepa Mehta’s Hindi-language Water was nominated in 2007. (43) We know our art: When museums want to tour their blockbuster exhibits, they know to stop here first. From the Picasso show at the AGO to Sebastião Salgado’s work at the ROM, Canada is the stop for top-tier North American premieres. (44) Our festivals rule: TIFF is by far North America’s most important film festival, and the world’s second-biggest after Cannes. Hot Docs is North America’s biggest documentary festival. Contact is the continent’s biggest photography festival. Just For Laughs is the biggest comedy festival. Montreal’s Jazz Festival is still the largest, with the most free concerts, the largest purpose-built downtown outdoor concert space and the most audacious programming. And Toronto’s Caribana is the continent’s biggest Caribbean carnival.

Sports & leisure

45. We dominate hockey: Stanley Cups aside, hockey is still Canada’s game. While the percentage of Canadians playing in the NHL has declined since the 1980s, Canadians still make up more than 50 per cent of all players in the league, compared to Americans, who account for just one-quarter of players.

46. Better football: Since the late 1970s, the National Football League has been tweaking its rules to encourage more passing—that is, to make the U.S. game more exciting. Up here, we got it right the first time: a three-down game on a great, big field. So on second and 10, you can bet that ball will be in the air.

47. We’re actually better at tennis now: While most Canadians have been preoccupied with hockey, a young man from Thornhill, Ont., has quietly become one of the most successful men’s tennis players in Canadian history. As of June, Milos Raonic’s ranking was No. 15 among singles players and, statistically speaking, he has the strongest serve in the world, serving more aces per match than any other professional player in 2012. America’s current top male singles player is Sam Querrey, whose ranking, as of June, was No. 19.

48. We were first to the races: When it comes to sporting events, Canada got off to an early start. Established in 1816, the Royal St. John’s Regatta is North America’s oldest annual sporting event. Hamilton’s Around the Bay Race is North America’s longest distance road race, which began in 1894, beating Boston by three years. And this July Toronto plays host to the 154th running of the Queen’s Plate, the oldest continuously run stakes race on the continent.

49. We have better skiing: Canada’s most popular ski resort, Whistler, trumps America’s most-visited resort, Vail, with more trails (200 vs. 193), longer runs (a total of 36,960 feet vs. 15,840 feet) and more snow (469 inches vs. 348 inches)

50. We see more of the world: Last year Canadians took close to 10 million trips abroad to countries other than the U.S. Despite having a population nearly 10 times that of Canada, Americans made just 30 million trips overseas. The poor showing from U.S. travellers shouldn’t be a surprise. While 65 per cent of Canadians hold a valid passport, only 35 per cent of Americans do.

There’s more: (51) We’re more plugged into the Internet: In Canada, 83 out of every 100 people surf the web, compared to 77.9 per cent in America. (52) We invent more sports: Canadians invented lacrosse, ice hockey and basketball. Oh, and five-pin bowling. What did Americans invent? Baseball. (Football doesn’t count since it’s just a mutated form of rugby). (53) We get outdoors more: A survey by the Canadian Tourism Commission found that more Canadians (30 per cent) consider themselves outdoor adventure enthusiasts than Americans (26 per cent). (54) We spend less time on the couch: Americans watch 34 hours of TV each week, four more than Canadians.

Environment & geography

55. Canada has earned a poor reputation when it comes to fighting climate change, but if you believe the globe is about to undergo a catastrophic shift in weather patterns, Canada is the best place to ride it out. UCLA geographer Laurence Smith has argued that by 2050 warming will unlock vast new resources and transform Canada into an economic superpower.

56. Carp-eh diem: We do not yet have to contend with the dreaded Asian carp, a species of fish that has invaded U.S. waterways, killing off competing species wherever it goes. The fish are big—up to 40 kg—and they’re crazy, literally throwing themselves into passing boats. Natural resources officials believe we’ve so far avoided the onslaught, but really, if this mini-monster reaches the Great Lakes, our rivers are doomed.

57. Less spin: Americans mock our weather, but come late spring, we can only look south with pity. We average just 60 reports of actual tornadoes per year compared with the 1,200 confirmed tornado strikes in the U.S., the most of any country in the world. Only five per cent of our storms reach the EF-3 category of intensity, the level where winds of more than 220 km/h start tearing up buildings and trees. The U.S. gets about 37 such tornadoes annually, costing the country 80 lives.

58. We help them repopulate their endangered species: When the U.S. wants to help an animal species come back from the brink, they call on Canada. In 1995, dozens of grey wolves were captured in Alberta and shipped south to be let free in Yellowstone National Park, 72 years after the park’s last wolf den was destroyed under a federal extermination plan. Next year Alaska will reintroduce wood bison, North America’s largest living land mammals, into the wilderness. The animals come from a captive herd started with Canadian animals.

59. Niagara Falls: Canada’s horseshoe falls vs. the American side. Enough said.

60. Water, water everywhere: With less than half a per cent of the world’s population, we have seven per cent of its renewable water supply—the most per inhabitant of any developed country. The supply for an average American is just 11 per cent of what’s available to us.

There’s more: (61) We have more beautiful coast to enjoy: 243,000 km of shoreline compared to 153,000 km in the U.S. (62) According to the OECD Better Life Index our air is cleaner (16 micrograms of particulate matter per cubic metre here compared to 18 in the U.S.) and (63) . . . so too is our water (89 per cent of Canadians report being satisfied with the quality of local water, versus 87 per cent in the U.S.).

Politics

64. We’re more peaceful: This year, Canada was ranked the eighth most peaceful country in the world. The U.S is ranked 100th.

65. Our election turnout is more fair: While voter turnout may be higher in the United States, it’s much more equitable in Canada, with broad social inclusion of both high-income and low-income voters. In Canada, voter turnout for the richest 20 per cent of the population is roughly 63 per cent, whereas the participation rate of the bottom 20 per cent is only slightly less, at 60 per cent. In the States, roughly 79 per cent of the wealthiest voters turn out to cast ballots, compared to just slightly more than half of the poorest voters.

66. Federally, our politicians are (slightly) more representative of the gender divide: Federally, women make up 24.7 per cent of Parliament, compared to the U.S. Congress where women account for just 17.8 per cent of representatives.

67. Provincially, our leaders are (much) more representative of the gender divide: The governments of Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Nunavut are all led by females who are responsible for governing more than 87 per cent of Canada’s population. By comparison, America has just five female governors, and the vast majority of Americans live in male-governed states.

68. We have far fewer assassinations: Since Confederation, only three Canadian politicians have been assassinated, including two Fathers of Confederation: Thomas D’Arcy McGee was shot by a Fenian sympathizer in 1868; George Brown was shot in the leg by a former Globe employee in 1880 (the wound led to a fatal infection). Quebec minister of labour Pierre Laporte was kidnapped and assassinated by the FLQ in 1970. In the United States, a staggering 44 politicians have been assassinated, including four sitting presidents.

69. We’re fine with gay politicians: While former New Jersey governor Jim McGreevey might be called the first (and only) “openly gay” governor in American history, it doesn’t really count if you resign as soon as you come out of the closet. In Canada, not only is Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne openly gay, but her sexual orientation barely factors into coverage of Ontario politics. With all the scandals to beset Queen’s Park, the premier’s personal life is the least shocking thing about Ontario’s government.

There’s more: (70) We attract more immigrants: Canada gets 5.65 per 1,000 people, compared to the U.S., with 3.64 per 1,000. (71) We have fewer lobbyists: We’ve seen an explosion in lobbying, but in Canada the ratio of lobbyists to senators and MPs is still 12 to 1, while in the U.S. the ratio of lobbyists to members of Congress is 23 to 1. Some estimate the U.S. ratio is as high as 65 to 1 since many lobbyists don’t register. (72) We mandate a time for holding the government’s feet to the fire: Sure, question period has degenerated in recent years, but nothing like it exists in the U.S. political system. (73) You don’t have to be rich to run for the highest office in the land: U.S. presidential elections cost an estimated $7 billion to mount, while Canada’s top five parties were allowed to spend a combined $90 million, thanks to Elections Canada spending limits.

Science & Technology

74. We have the “most social astronaut”: Eight North Americans have commanded the International Space Station over the last four years, but only Canada’s Chris Hadfield became a household name worldwide. His photos, duets from space and that cover of Space Oddity helped catapult @Cmdr_Hadfield to one million Twitter followers. @TheRealBuzz (Aldrin) has 806,000.

75. Holy crap, we’re discovering a miracle cure: Canada is a leader in fecal transplant therapy (it’s exactly what it sounds like). By transferring healthy bacteria from a donor’s stool into patients suffering from potentially fatal gut infections like C. difficile, doctors believe it could one day cure all sorts of ailments, maybe even obesity and allergies.

76. We lead in quantum computing: What’s that, you ask? Rather than calculating with ones or zeros as conventional computers do, quantum computers can theoretically harness subatomic particles to process more complex calculations in a fraction of the time. And scratch the word theoretical. In May, Burnaby, B.C.-based D-Wave said one of its quantum computers, the only such machines commercially available, will be installed at the new Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab, a collaboration between Google, the Universities Space Research Association and NASA.

77. We’re wiring the oceans like no one else: Canada’s NEPTUNE and VENUS projects off the coast of B.C. have installed fibre-optic cables that transmit data from the bottom of the ocean. In 2011, Popular Science named NEPTUNE one of humankind’s “top 10 most ambitious science projects” alongside the Large Hadron Collider and the International Space Station.

78. Our dinosaur discoveries are cooler: Not only did archaeologists uncover the largest-ever bed of dinosaur bones near Medicine Hat, Alta., in 2010, since then scientists re-examining old fossils identified a new species of spiky-headed dinosaur called Xenoceratops foremostensis—or “alien horned-face from Foremost.” Wired recently listed the world’s 10 best new dinosaur discoveries. Four came from Canada, while just one was dug up in America.

There’s more: (79) We’re more rational: Most Canadians (61 per cent) accept evolution, compared to just 30 per cent of Americans. Incidentally, the same percentage believe Bigfoot is “definitely” or “probably” real. (80) We’re world leaders in space robotics: There’s the Canadarm, of course, but also Dextre, which lives on the International Space Station and is the most advanced space robot ever built–a “space handyman” that fixes up the station. In January, Dextre performed the first demonstration that a robot could refuel a satellite in orbit, which could give our satellites longer lives in space.

Crime & calamity

81. We don’t have out-of-control prison sentences: Last year 38,700 people were serving time in Canada, roughly 114 for every 100,000 citizens. That’s nothing. In the U.S. 2.24 million Americans are locked up—716 for every 100,000 citizens, the highest incarceration rate in the world. Canada ranks 136th.

82. Our government doesn’t kill people: Canada officially abolished capital punishment in 1976, but no Canadian inmate has been executed since 1962. By contrast, the U.S. put 43 prisoners to death last year alone, while 3,125 inmates continue to wait on death row.

83. Our judges are appointed, not elected: While some believe Canadian judges should be picked directly by citizens, as is common in American courts, the idea has largely been written off as inconsistent with the Constitution, which could be for the best. Studies show judges have difficulty being impartial on the bench, when, as candidates, they rely heavily on donors and special interest groups for support. As well, a study showed judges increase their sentences when facing re-election. In fact, electoral zealousness added six per cent to overall prison time for aggravated assault, rape and robbery sentences. That helps explain America’s crowded prisons.

84. We’re more relaxed about pot: In both countries, support for legalizing marijuana is at all-time highs. In 2012, 66 per cent of Canadians supported legalization or decriminalization, compared to half of Americans.

85. Mass shootings here are rare: Since 1982 in the U.S. there have been at least 45 shootings in which at least six people were killed. In total, 434 people were murdered in those incidents, and another 384 injured. During that time, there were two such events in Canada—the bodies of eight Bandidos gang members were discovered in a Ontario farmer’s field in 2006, while in 1989, 14 women were gunned down at the École Polytechnique.

There’s more: (86) We have far fewer murders: Our homicide rate is 1.73 per 100,000 people, compared to 4.7 in the U.S. (87) Our roads are safer: The number of fatalities from traffic accidents in Canada is 8.8 for every 100,000 people, compared to 13.9 in the U.S. (88) Our youth are safer: America has the highest mortality rate for young people ages 10 to 24 among developed countries, with a death rate of 60 per 100,000 of the population, compared to less than 40 in Canada. (89) We’re less likely to get robbed: Canada’s robbery rate is 86 per 100,000, far below America’s rate of 114.

General Canadian awesomeness

90. We’re more popular: Backpackers knew it for years, but studies confirm the Maple Leaf really is beloved around the world. In 2012, the Canada brand held top spot in the Reputation Institute’s ranking of countries based on people’s trust, admiration and affinity for them. America’s reputation rank: 23rd.

91. Our taste in chocolate is better: Everyone knows we have loads of chocolate candy varieties you can’t get in the U.S.—Coffee Crisp, Aero, Smarties—but earlier this year Hershey’s said it re-engineered its chocolate recipe to better appeal to Canadian palates. A Hershey’s spokesperson said Canadians prefer smoother and sweeter chocolate compared to the “grittier or even cheesier flavour” chocolate found in America.

92. Our national symbol is a worthier animal: Yes, eagles soar high, have incredible eyesight and razor-sharp talons. They’re also carrion-eating louts. As Ben Franklin once noted, “I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen the Representative of our Country. He is a Bird of bad moral Character. He does not get his Living honestly . . . like those among Men who live by Sharping & Robbing he is generally poor and often very lousy . . . a rank Coward.” The beaver, on the other hand, is a rugged, humble and industrious little creature (okay, rodent).

93. Roadside wonderland: Canada has more than 1,200 roadside attractions. The U.S. may have more in sheer numbers, but nothing compares to our giant duck, perogy, sausage, Easter egg, hockey stick, moose, apple, dinosaur, nickel or lobster.

94. Our Canadian bacon is better than their Canadian bacon: This can get confusing, but try to follow along. When Americans buy “Canadian bacon,” they get a package of fully-cooked processed slices of ham, which Canadians don’t actually eat. Canadian bacon, on the other hand, isn’t called that by Canadians. Instead it’s peameal bacon, a Toronto creation of pickle-brine-cured pork loin rolled in cornmeal. It’s a travesty most Americans can’t tell the difference.

There’s more: (95) Giant American corporations associate with our unofficial mascot: Up to 80 per cent of the world’s polar bears are in Canada—Americans have to make do with polar bears in Coke commercials and on pop cans. (96) Our lobsters taste better: It’s an endless debate between fishermen and chefs in the Maritime provinces and Maine. We claim the cooler waters of Canada spawn tastier crustaceans. Americans disagree. But most Maine lobster is processed in Canada anyway, so we dominate both ways. (97) Better sea monsters: Both Ogopogo and the lesser-known monster in Lake Champlain have been captured on video in recent years. The U.S.’s most famous sea monster, Jaws, isn’t even real. (98) We’re record-setters: For our population size, no other country breaks more Guinness world records. (99) Our national anthem is better: Musicologists in Britain analyzed eight anthems to see which drew listeners to join in most—O Canada ranked 5th ahead of the Star-Spangled Banner (6th)




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99 reasons why it’s better to be Canadian

  1. Good lord, this article is just completely unreadable.

    I propose an experiment. Change the headline: “99 reasons why it’s better to be Canadian than x”.

    First value for x is “American”, obviously.

    Next, substitute as many country names for x as you can. Divide into columns, which ones Maclean’s would actually print, and which just sound unspeakably racist.

    Have fun, you guys.

    • okay, okay, ‘demonym’, not ‘country name’.

      I’ll go first.

      99 reasons why it’s better to be Canadian than Chine… oh, that’s awful.

    • Of course its completely unintelligible to the Average American who doesn’t care or who wouldn’t know the difference.

      • Who cares about Canada. You guys are nothing but homosexuals. Always flying around that queer flag. It’s a maple leaf, hahahahah. Looks like a household cleaning label. hahaha. Atleast the US flag has stripes and stars.

        • The maple leaf on the Canadian flag represents the maple Canada produces, we’re proud of it, its been apart of Canada for many years.
          The red on the flag represents the ‘blood’ through the wars and becoming out own country.
          You cant say that all 35.1 million Canadians are homosexual, 1 out of every 3 people are homosexual.
          But nice logic.

        • This is why I want to leave America. So much rudeness and a lack of respect for others.

          • finally someone understands life. Thank you Nicolaas Strik

        • What is wrong with you Britishman478? You look like a household cleaning label you incompetent fool. Get a life jerk. Get out from under whatever rock you’re living under and wake up and smell the tea and crumpets. You disgust me >:D

          • 100% agree with lalaloopsy1223. You are so stupid Britishman. And you have a TERRIBLE username. I’ve been to Canada and its amazing!

    • Relax your testicles fool

      • that is not appropriate you goon.

    • Honestly we all have our opinions, But you have to admit Canada is better!

    • canadians eat bacon, ride polar bears as transportation, and drink more maple syrup than americans drink beer. YADAYADAYADAYADAPEWPIEPIE!!!!!!! also go buy a fridge at ikea and don’t return it. its fun, trust meh. then put wheels on the fridge, stuff a fluffy friend in it, and push it down the stairs into a dumpster. Also very fun. Much good, much good.

  2. Divorce stats are incorrectly reported in the article,

    Instead of “For every 1,000 marriages in the U.S., 3.6 end in divorce annually, compared to 2.1 in Canada.”

    It should read “For every 1,000 population in the U.S., 3.6 marriages end in divorce annually, compared to 2.1 in Canada.” Or something like that.

    See the reference.

    • Thanks for the heads-up on this, Jim. We’ve corrected it.

    • But it’s NOT for every 1000 population, since it takes 2 people to be married…so their rationale is correct.

      • **woosh**

      • yeah, there saying for every 1000 population. so there might be 25 couples per 1000 population and thats 50 people per 1000 population so 25 mariages end. it doesnt matter what population they take from. its the average mariage per population, and the averager divorces per population

  3. Of course, most Americans don’t care or wouldn’t know the difference.
    The big ones that you don’t mention,
    higher taxes, higher cost of living and bad weather.
    This keeps me living in California USA even though I’m still proud to be Canadian.

    • There are valid reasons for the higher taxes: public health care; smaller population on a larger land mass (meaning more cost per person for infrastructure). The smaller population is also in part responsible for the higher cost of living (as is the northern clime – shorter growing season with less variety). Strikes me as a reasonable trade-off (though I’m sure there are plenty who will disagree).

      As for the weather – well, that’s debatable – and at least partially a subjective valuation. I’m not a lover of heat (after more than two decades in ON I still prefer NL summers), and while drought and seasonal wildfires that regularly burn people out (California) or living in tornado alley (see #57) or being front & center in the hurricane landfall path may be your idea of good weather, I’ll take our more boring but more stable four seasons, thanks!

      • Property taxes are outrageous in California (and legal fees). Property taxes are 1.28% compared to .26% for BC with no capital gain tax. We couldn’t afford our house in California. Our property taxes would be $10,000 Higher! Also, I’d rather pay the higher income taxes (which are minimal compared with all the nickel and dime taxes in the US) for 100% health coverage.
        My Dad had to claim bankruptcy in Oregon in 1998 after paying Blue Cross $850.00 month and being denied coverage for treatment for his cancer. He had to do this in his a couple of weeks before he died.
        An American living in Canada and LOVING IT!

        • was hoping i could get some advise from you. . . im living in NY dying to move because im just throwing money out of the window and i really am considering BC so im gathering up as much info a possible to see if ill be paying less out their for like rent etc.

          • well, if your worried about money, i would recommend alberta or saskatchewan (watch out for saskatchewan, has the highest crime rate in canada) , the chances of you getting a job is way better :D plus ull get a bigger house for less than u would in the us.

      • The USA has 50 states, you know. Stay in Canada.

        • what does the fox say? RINGDINGDINGDINGDING GO BUY A FRIDGE AT HOME DEPOT AND GET A FREEZER TOO!

    • Higher taxes is a good thing and we have great weather. At Least we don’t get forest fires and earthquakes like you do in Cali.

      • Yeah, I am a USian who has moved to Canada, and I get annoyed when conservative Canadians bitch about their taxes.

        Yes, higher taxes, but a better and richer society. Everyone gets health care, the schools are all well-funded, and not based on local tax base, like the US,which leads to institutional racism: poor black and brown schools are grossly underfunded and their teachers are the first to be fired.

        I am happy to pay higher taxes. This, “I got mine, fuck you” mentality is so American, sadly some Canadians have it as well :(

        But of course, if Harper is not booted in 2015, he will turn Canada into another United States. He will kill single payer, there will be even more inequality, US style, but at least you will have lower taxes. Sheesh.

        • Leave it to an idiot Liberal to make this article about Harper. Ya sure lets let a retard like Justin Trudeau lead the greatest country in the world.

          • What makes you think that Arn supports Trudeau?

            “Retard”?

            How old are you? Is this as articulate as it gets for Conservatives?

    • Atleast you’re man enough to admit that.

  4. As an expat living in China for ten years, I’ve had more peace and freedom than I could ever have living in Toronto. China is not what the media tells you. It’s in fact safer in Asia these days considering all of the financial uncertainty in both the US and Canada. It’s hidden by both governments and you can expect a collapse in the near future.

    • Are you dating Bob Dechert too?

    • Toronto is not Canada, how can you compare a Country with a city. I live in a very peaceful city in Canada and it is not Toronto

      • TORONTO IS A CITY IN CANADA!!!! FOR POT’S SAKE!!! AND GO EAT YOUR LITTLE FISHY CRACKERS RIGHT NOW YOU GOOFY SLITZY-PEWP

    • What is your definition of “Freedom?” because I’m a writer who recently returned from several years in Asia, and I can tell you, from my perspective, and that of a heck of a lot of other people, there is not “more freedom” in China. The statement is ludicrous from my perspective, in fact. I realize things are starting to open up there, and I agree (to some extent) with your assessment of the financial problems facing the west, but you are missing a few things about China, too, or else supremely indifferent to anyone who doesn’t happen to live at the top of the pyramid (uh, visited a sweat shop recently? how about a prison?). I know a number of ethnic minorities in China with friends and family in prison for their religious and/or political beliefs who would disagree with you pretty heavily, too. Sheesh. What a ridiculous thing to say…I can’t believe how much some people take their privilege for granted. But yeah, you go on spreading the great news of totalitarian capitalism just as far and wide as you can. Wasn’t it Rockefeller who said that the “China experiment” was such a great example of how capitalism works better without democracy? I guess as long as you can live in your oblivious version of “peace and freedom” who cares, right? Oh, until it’s your kid or your wife who gets carted off to jail…but maybe they deserve it, too.

      • Says the guy who lives where there are fines and bylaws for just about everything from how long the blades of grass on your lawn are to how high your porch step is.

        In Canada, booze is so heavily controlled by our ludicrously patronizing government that you can’t have a beer as you walk down the street (which by the way is the exception around the world rather than the rule).

        In a pub back in Canada last year the waitress told me that after my dinner if I wanted to move from the patio section to the bar area that it must be her that carries my pint across the dining floor rather than me – that was the law.

        Canadians are the most uptight, rule-bound people in the world.

        I’ve enjoyed living in China for the past five years – a place where people mind their own business and aren’t constantly peering into their neighbour’s backyard looking for something to criticize.

    • Please do not compare China to Toronto. Just stop

  5. Every year we do this to ourselves….just once I’d like to see us be realistic.

    ‘A steady, secure life somewhere in the middle—average—is over.’

  6. 1 reason to not to be an canadian is because of not to living beside canadians like you

    • One of the nice things about Canada is no one forces you to stay.

    • Ah, but we probably speak at least one language well, unlike you! :-). Allow me to re-write your scribble:
      “One reason not to be a Canadian is that one needn’t live beside Canadians such as you.”
      There’s your first lesson in how to compose a sentence that is legible.

      • Canadians rule eh? :p proud to be Canadian

    • * one reason not to be a Canadian is because I don’t have to live beside Canadians like you*

    • oh look a squirrel…..check it for C4 (cause in America everything is terrorism)

      • There was no need for that…

  7. so when will you start paying for your own defence, eh

    • What are you even talking about? Is this that lame old argument about the USA keeping Canada safe? If anything, we’re only a target BECAUSE of US foreign policy and our ties to that country.

      • and we can fend for ourselves, just remember what we did to the original white house ;)

        • What? that was the British… not Canada…?

          • actually most were Canadians just serving under the british…….

    • Defend from who? These days, the US is probably our biggest threat; we have lots of stuff they want, and they are by far the most military-minded these days – and set to implode. When that all shakes out who knows what will happen to Canada?

      If China wants us, on the other hand, they’ll just buy us (likely with Harper’s help).

      • we’re close friends with Russians that still hate u.s

        • The U.S. and Russia have a strong alliance to this day, just see the partnership we had in the situation in Syria… so yah…. pay attention to the world around you before you make judgment!

        • You’re also close to the UK, because you’re still under partial British rule. The British Gov General is in your country for a reason. And she’s in charge of your parliment for a reason as well. Get a clue Canada,lol.

    • Canada has an armed force, maybe not the millions of soldiers the USA has, but our forces are respected the world over as being fair and firm. most countries would rather have Canadian troops fighting beside them than American. fewer friendly fire accidents

      • Canadian soldiers are pussies.

        • No soldier should be described as that. You go fight and possibly die for your country. Keep your immature and outright idiotic comments to yourself.

          • you dont fight or die for your counrty… you fight and die for the government’s agenda… this has always been true throughout history

      • Ugly picture by the way. Your military is a token force. Also the USA conducted 70% of all military operations. There will be friendly fire incidents with that many US soldiers. The British killed 30 of their own soldiers in friendly fire incidents. My God, you Canadians are so stupid.

      • Canada isn’t even a real country. The Queen is still on your money, and she has disolved your parliment 3 times in 7 years, lol. Also, the British apointed Gov General rules your parliment and your country, lol. Atleast the americans fought for their freedom from us. The British.

    • If anything, you assholes bring the trouble to us. We’d be much safer not living next to the states

    • Pretty sure America has given Canada a target, thanks to its ridiculously aggressive foreign policy.

    • defense against what??????? there are no REAL threats. the biggest terrorist nation on earth is the USA. fact.

  8. Hey, I love Canada, and I think there are lots of great things to celebrate about being Canadian, but I’m sick and tired of being compared to the US. I stopped reading when I realized that the article was just a comparison of the two countries.
    In some ways we are undoubtedly better off than the Americans, while in other ways we may be worse off. But what really matters to me is whether we are improving steadily compared to our own benchmarks. The CanadaArm is great, but are we continuing to lead and innovate in robotics? I’m glad Canadian kids are doing better than their American counterparts on international tests, but are they doing better than they were 10 years ago? I’m glad there are fewer obese people in Canada than the US but the fact that a quarter of Canadians can be classified as obese is nothing to brag about.

    Let us set our own standards–high ones–and then congratulate ourselves for exceeding them. That is the true measure of greatness.

    • Agreed, I am an USian living in Canada, and your standards should be MUCH higher than the US. More like Finland.

    • You are awesome and wise ! you must be Canadian.

      • Canada’s the best country in the world hands down. (thats my opinion) But i am sick of Canada being Americanized. The Hudson Bay Company is now owned by an American company. I am proud of the Canadian military and how advanced they are even though they don’t get nearly enough credit. Everyones all about the American military and stuff because its everywhere in the movies and theres even advertisements for the army in American malls. Where as in Canada we don’t do that. Anyways I’m a proud Canadian. Haha like it said in this article (i think anyways) if you want to live the “American Dream” move to Canada. lol

    • I completely agree, I am from Massachusetts and plan on going to school in Montréal, so in many ways I adore Canada, but I also love my country. HOWEVER there is absolutely no reason for this to have developed into a massive argument! what did any of you gain from the comments you are posting! We are not at war so why do we say these hateful things. Yes, we should have nationalism and competition, however only to improve our own country off of the other. So can’t this apathy stop and maybe then we can combine this waste of energy on something more productive internationally. The U.N. was not created just to harbor hate!

    • Leave the UK first, and then we’ll talk about it. Otherwise, you’re still the beotch of the UK. Our little lap dog.

  9. Nationalism is a barbarous relic (like racism.) It’s foolish to believe Canada is somehow the best country in the world. For example, we rank #24 in infant mortality rate and #24 in homicide rate out of 31 developed countries. If a country is comprised of delusional bigots, how on Earth will it ever deal with its shortcomings?

    • Maclean’s is not saying Canada is the best country in the world, nor is it ever claiming that, all that is being stated is that Canada, statistically, is a better place to live and be a citizen of, than the USA. This being based on many (99) differing points on social structure, average overall health, happiness of citizens, and other such factors, and as a proud Canadian, I feel that if someone doesn’t feel as though they do not like this amazing country then they do not have to live here. We do not have things like drafts (apart from WWI and WWII understandably) or absurdly long prison sentences to detain residents in our country. Just so long as they have a valid passport to leave.

    • If Canada sets as a standard to be better than US then we could never be the greatest. There are a lot of European countries that are a better mark for excellence, quality of life and social justice

  10. How very sad that in order to define ourself we absolutely must find reasons why we are not like someone else… Ironically I read this article on june 24th (St-Jean Baptist day) and on that day, if you had asked anyone in Québec what they were, they would have simply told you that they are Québécois. No one would have looked for a 100 reasons to diferenciate themselves with another nation. This pathetic need to compare to the US is typical of Canada for reasons I don’t understand. And the worst part is that when we are not doing that, we are holding on to the british crown… I can’t wait till the day that Canadians simply define themselves like me as being canadian.

    • Although there are many political viewpoints held by Quebecers that I absolutely disagree with, the argument made here, in my opinion is 100% valid. Well said my Québécois friend.

    • Well said Christian, specially with the last sentence. Taking advantage of the past to be better canadian. Cheers!

  11. How does dropping the F Bomb on television supposedly make us better.

    • It’s not so much dropping the “F” bomb, it’s the fact that we are not censored like they are in the U.S. Even our Degrassi Street is censored down there…and there are some episodes they just don’t show

  12. You forgot the really important bragging point for Canadians….our far superior beer! Cheers and Happy Canada Day Weekend.

    • I agree. I was surprised that this important point was overlooked. I feel sorry for people who go through their entire lives drinking American beer, not realizing that there is something much better.

      • You obviously haven’t travelled south in the past, oh, 15 years and sampled a region’s microbrews. Portland, Oregon, for example. Some of the best beer in the entire world.

        • no, Irish beer , then German , Canadian

          • Why is everything remotely American unjustly criticized? We get it, every country is better than the US. Stop with the biased statements and other exaggerated falsities.

          • I think it’s Belgium first then German.

    • You probably already know why making love on the beach is similar to American beer – they’re both f*cking near water :)

      • Hahaha!

      • in Canada we say why having sex on a canoe is like American beer- they’re both F***** close to water

      • in America they call it survivor, while in canda we call it camping :)

  13. Please take Justin Bieber back. We don’t want him anymore.

    • you turned him into what he is now from a nice, helpful kid with a good voice. the monster actor/musician is a purely American thing

      • What if we throw in Jim Carrey and a six-pack of Moosehead?

        • a six pack? hell no, at least a two four

          • You drive a hard bargain… Okay, then, but we’re keeping the Ferrari.

  14. 100k abortions a year is nothing to be proud of…

    • 3 million since 1969.

    • Having the choice IS a good thing

      • having the choice. So true and choice of religion to.

    • neither is 25% obesity or having bigger houses

    • Would denying the choice be better?

  15. As a dual citizen (Canadian/American) I can see that a lot of the reasons is Political. Harper and the Conservatives are responsible for this. Obama and the American liberals in the form of the Democrats are responsible for America’s economic decline. It was not always liked this. just a word to the wise Canadian electorate.

    • I’m pretty sure it was Dubya and his cronies who bailed out the banks and let the citizens get screwed over

      • Actually genius that was Obama. Most of that happened after the inauguration

        • Obama and the Bush are pretty much the same. Obama has expanded the Bush doctrine.

          US Democrats are not liberals, they are conservatives, the US REpublican Party are extremists

          • Obama and Bush, there all just TV teleprompters for the government there puppets n a string being dangled for the people. the just read a script

          • That is because they were both Democrats and Partisan… plus your statement is bias there are variations in the parties… not just conservatives and extremists…

    • I always believe that Obama inherited the “America’s economic decline” from Bush and the conservatives in the form of republicans a.k.a tea party are the one that don’t let him govern with their extreme opposition in every single matter.

    • your just dumb –circle– lol the republicans created the recession with that joke bush. lol another thing were better at lol we know American politics better han they do lol your education system is a joke gobree with your sister

      • What?

    • When it comes to fiscal policy, Obama is no different from harper or Bush. And no different than Bush on foreign policy.

    • Harper is making our country worse.

      • Liberal idiot alert

        • hahaha yea

  16. Canada is famously known over the world for its hospitality and its acceptance without reserve of the diversity of its populations. I was born is a north african country where the sun always shine, but without freedom of speech. Religiously tolerated, but considered a Dhimi — a second or perhaps a third class citizen. I found in Canada a new life that allowed me to enjoy liberty, equality, fraternity. LIBERTY, EQUALITY, FRATERNITY, are more prevalent in Canada than in France where they were engraved in stone. Thank you Canada for having accepted me, …some 50 years ago. I have built a family with grand children who I see enjoying life and education not always available elsewhere. I am glad I chose Canada over the USA when I had a chance. NO REGRETS.

    • so glad you ended up in our beautiful country. I am first generation Canadian, and beyond grateful my parents choose to immigrate here. I’ve lived in BC, Alta, Sask, Ont and Nova Scotia, and across my broad experience, would never consider raising my children in another country.

  17. The Canadian national anthem is NOT better than the US counterpart. More people joined in to sing it because presumably it is more approachable and less intimidating to the average singer than the Star Spangled Banner. That does not equate to “better.”

    • more approachable? less intimidating? At least our [Canadian] national anthem isn’t about glory and triumph through war [full lyrics: http://www.usa-flag-site.org/song-lyrics/star-spangled-banner.shtml.

      That said, how is an anthem that comes in three versions more approachable? We’ve got english, french, and bilingual versions [lyrics:http://www.pch.gc.ca/eng/1359402373291/1359402467746. Any time I hear the anthem sung, I hear many people stop or stumble when the version turns out to be the one they were not expecting or don’t even know.

      • Yes, more approachable and less intimidating. If you doubt that the Star Spangled Banner is harder to sing than O Canada, you are in the extreme minority. The former has a larger range and stays longer in the high range, as well as has more lyrics, including obscure words. All of that makes for a much more complex piece of music. And as far as your comment about “war,” the song (we’re talking about the standardized one that was debuted at Carnegie Hall in 1917, not the one you linked to) is essentially a song about the wonder of seeing your country’s flag still flying from a fort after a bombardment from an attacking army. That’s defensive, not offensive war. You should really learn the difference. Even O Canada has reference to protecting the homeland from attack. But because the Star Spangled Banner paints a more vivid and passionate picture with its beautiful lyrics, it is the superior song both lyrically and musically.

        • Actually, the incident you’re referring to occurred during the War of 1812, where the U.S. was definitely the aggressor. After all it was the U.S. who, goaded by Southern hawks, declared war on Britain and it was the U.S., hungry for land, who invaded Canada (claiming they were there to “liberate” us).
          By the end of the war, Canada had more land than they had started out with. Unfortunately, the British made us give it back. The most celebrated victory the U.S. had in that war was the Battle of New Orleans, which occurred after the whole thing was over.
          During most of the conflict the U.S. was regularly out fought by a combination of Natives, British regulars, French and English Canadians — and the Canadian winter. The whole Star Spangled Banner incident followed hot on the heels of us burning down the White House, which resulted in President Madison leaving town so fast, he forgot Dolly.
          None of which means one anthem is “better” than the other, of course, but to call the War of 1812 a “defensive” war on the Americans’ part displays a staggering ignorance of history.

          • The words to the Star-Spangled Banner are from the poem “Defence of Fort McHenry,” which celebrates the survival of a fort protecting Baltimore, Maryland, from burning by the British that the US capital suffered the month before. It does not celebrate war in general nor even the War of 1812. (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Spangled_Banner).

    • Literally the one thing I think the US does way better than Canada is the anthem. I LOVE their anthem, the melody is so much nicer than ours.

      • sure, but it glorifies war while ours signifies peace and acceptance

        • It really doesn’t. “Stand on guard” is certainly not a sign of peace, and the French version has a line about being ready to “wield the sword” so what are you even talking about.

  18. The only one thing that sometime scare me about Canada is that the reformist in form of the conservatives and the reformist wanna be of Ontario a.k.a progressive conservative party want to change the country and province for the worst. God save Canada.

    • you do know that there are people living outside the borders of Ontario, don’t you?

      • Yes, I Know Canada is a large country. I live in Toronto, Ontario that why I mention the situation here.

        • then perhaps you should consider checking put the rest of the world . try coming to Calgary during the Stampede this year. just see how real Canadians pull together. and also how Albertans party

          • “Real” Canadians? How are Albertans any “realer” than Newfoundlanders or British Columbians or Baffin Islanders or even Quebecois? We’re ALL Canadians, and so far I haven’t come across any of us lacking the ability to party. Let’s leave the “realness” crap for the poor beleaguered bipolar nation South of the Border — and for those Canadians who never learned or have any interest in learning their own history.

          • I am actually Ontario born and raised. and I can tell you from experience that many Ontarions think only they count in Canada and have never been beyond its borders except for a weekend trip to Montreal or NY state. I’ve actually had people asking when I was planning to come back to Canada( meaning Ontario)

          • Maybe you don’t know it, Kevin but Alberta is full of people from other parts of Canada. 1/3 of the population is made up of people from Newfoundland, BC, Quebec and even the north. Personally, I did visit St. John’s Newfoundland recently. It was a wonderful experience. The people are warm and welcoming. I live in Calgary but I too didn’t always live there. When I moved to this city, I found the people here to be very welcoming, just as judy has. There is very much of the “mayor Nenshi” attitude at play here.

        • Big surprise, you live in Toronto. Wow a person with a foreign name who votes Liberal. There is a stretch. It is ONLY because of Toronto that we have the current Liberal criminals in power right now. 2/3 of their seats are in Toronto. Maybe get out of the city for a change. The Liberals are IDIOTS !!!

    • Would you rather have the current Liberal gov’t who has lied cheated and stolen billions? E-heath, Orange, Gas plants, OLG, etc etc etc. Scandal after scandal, billions after billions but some how you still believe in these complete idiots of a party. I will take the Cons or the NDP any day over these self-serving morons we have now. It is just too bad the province is full of complete morons who always vote for the current criminal party in power.

  19. This article is one good reason not to read Macleans. Canada will finally grow up when Canadians lose themselves of the juvenile inferiority relationship with the US. Canada has achieved much and can define itself as it stands.

    • Amen – this constant comparing to Americans is a disturbing and candidly pathetic deep seated sense of insecurity – “thanks” to macleans for continuing to perpetuate and even prove out this “myth”.

  20. I have had lots of opportunities to live in the US but said no due to guns everywhere and exorbitant health care.

    • No guns in Canada? How do you protect yourselves from the polar bears?

      • we feed them American tourists

        • IOW, you don’t have to outrun the polar bears, just the tourists.

          • Hahaha!

  21. It is cruel to make comparisons versus a country which is committing suicide. I do hope I end up in one of the countries bordering Canada after the US breaks apart.

    • We in Canada “used” to be known for our sense of humor. This really is a tongue in cheek silly article, not meant to be taken seriously. It wouldn’t be ‘mannerly’ to brag ourselves up to the detriment of someone else. It just isn’t the Canadian way. The people on here don’t seem to realize that the article is meant to be taken with a grain of salt.

    • I’m sorry……..What?! How is the U.S. committing suicide?

  22. As a dual citizen living in the US, I can’t tell you how many Americans envy Canadians & always say when I say I’m Canadian, “Oh, I loooove Canadians!”. Yes, Canada is like an annoying little sibling to the US, and so likes to remind its muscular sibling to the south, what a great kid it really is…just like any family.

    • If Canadians want to get more attention in the United States, they need to start sneaking across the border in large numbers. We can set you up with a package deal that includes amnesty, food stamps, and pandering politicians.

      • There isn’t enough Canadians to make their immigration noticeable in a country as large as US. Just to prove it, there’s already many Canadians in US, you just can’t notice.

  23. THANKS. A NICE ARTICLE. CANADA IS TOP MOST MULTILTURAL COUNTRY. CANADA IS A GREAT COUNTRY A HOME OF MILLIONS OF PEOPLE AIMING TO MAKE THEIR NATIVE LAND. I HAVE COME TO CONCLUSION AFTER FORTY THREE YEARS IN CANADA, ‘THERE IS NO LACE ON THE EARTH LIKE CANADA FOR A PEACEFUL LIFE AD HEALTHY WORKING PLACE.’ – JAY GAJJAR, CM., M.A.,

    RECIPIENT OF ORDER OFCANADA, FIRST GUJARATI TO RECEIVE THIS HONOUR

    • a country that says is Multicultural it’s mean this country has no culture.

      All european contry reject muticulturalism, they find that it does not work.

      Canada is going nowhere with this mentality.

      It is simple look at the history of Canada, there is three roots :

      Native poeple,French and British.

  24. wow, what a smug and spiteful article. And we claim that Americans are arrogant……

    • Well said. This article is an embarrassment to all Canadians.

  25. #21 is completely incomprehensible for those of us in Vancouver. It’s the rest of the country that’s sensible enough to live in affordable houses. Most of us living in unaffordable Vancouver are in cramped condos.

  26. It’s funny how Canadians can only define themselves by comparing themselves to the US.

    Worst inferiority complex in the world, period.

    • Why exactly are you so upset at Canadians being proud of their country? Why does it bother you so much? Yes, it was all in comparison to the US but the US is also the only country we share a border with! Or are even close to! We know Americans better, we’ve been there, we watch their tv, it’s more fun to compare stuff to them then, say, Australia.

  27. All these “reasons” (see: selective, dishonest propaganda) don’t stop Canadians from moving to the US in droves.

    Canada only has 1/9th the population the US has yet there are four times as many Canadians living in the US as there are Americans living in Canada.

    • Oddly enough, I find that many of my neighbours are ex-Americans. Odder still, they tend to be the ones with very high IQs and higher still EQs.
      I think you guys get our rejects and we get your more intelligent peeps. But, hey! You still get to execute more people than any other country and continue to bomb the oldest human civilizations in the world – Great Stuff, sport! LOL

      • I’m pretty sure you just made all of that up.

        It’s actually intelligent Canadians that come to the US. The only Americans who have gone to Canada historically have been Tories, draft-dodgers, and rejects who couldn’t hack it in the US. Any Canadian of worth tends to jump ship the moment they get the chance and come to the US.

        Ever heard of brain drain? Yeah, intelligent people realize that there’s no use living in a shack when you can live in the chateau that’s just south.

        • I think you will find that the people moving north are now the secular, educated. with the rise of fundamentalist protestants in the south, there is no place else they’d feel safe. at least they know that they won’t get death threats for being atheists in Canada, because we accept smart people

        • I went to school in the US on a golf scholarship. It was basically grade 10 in Canada. The literacy rate down there is a joke. Unless you are in the IVY league or a few very select schools the education is laughable.
          I peer graded and could barely read the scratch these people wrote. I worked at maybe 50% of my ability and was tops in my class with ease.

          • The U.S. education system IS slowly failing… I can see it… as of they we are trying to completely reform high school education for newer generations.

    • yes, because they are paid better wages for being professionals in the States.American companies recruit doctors, nurses etc right out of university by paying off student loans and giving 4 year contracts with huge wages. Canadians are simply better educated than Americans. our doctors and nurses can go anywhere in the world and know they are the tops in their profession

      • Canadians are not better educated than Americans. Americans are more likely to receive both secondary and post-secondary education. American universities have higher academic performance in every field, including medicine:

        http://www.arwu.org/FieldMED2010.jsp

        Canadian doctors are NOT better. It’s hilarious how you Canadians feel the need to just make things up to cope with your inferiority complex. That’s what you’re doing now. Not only is this article itself an example how insecure Canadians are, but when someone comes a long and challenges is, you are so determined to defend the lies that you’ll make up some up yourself.

        What you just said is not true, it’s what you want to be true. That defines Canada’s self-image, it’s self-deception. Your entire perception of reality is based on propaganda.

        • wanna explain why American hospitals come to Canada to recruit if you are turning out such good doctors and nurses then?

          • Because you just made that up.

            Wanna explain why Americans win more nobel prizes in medicine than every other nationality combined? Wanna explain why American universities produce the best research output in the world and Canadian universities barely even have a showing?

            If Canadian doctors are better, explain why the US has higher survival rates from the two leading treatable diseases in the world, cancer and heart disease:

            http://b-i.forbesimg.com/theapothecary/files/2011/11/CONCORD-table1.jpg

            http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/news/20040920/us-tops-canada-in-post-heart-attack-care

            Seriously, get a grip on reality. You Canadians base all of your pride on lies, and those lies are always exclusively about pretending Canada is better than the US. You have THE worst inferiority complex in the world, and all your efforts as a nation are designed to cope with it. You’re excruciatingly nationalistic even though your nation is not remarkable at all, and isn’t even remotely better than the big American bogeyman you always point your finger at.

          • This silly list aside, we live next door to an elephant that threatens to smother our culture, so differentiation becomes a bit of a survival label. As for being unremarkable, I contrast it with some of the things the US is very well known for, like school shootings or Dick Cheney….

          • could it have anything to do with the fact that there are 10 times more people in the US than in Canada?

          • and if you remove all those presidents who were given the peace prize…. and the 10 people born in Canada

          • Yes like Obama getting a peace prize for ……. oh ya for being black. He was in office for exactly one month when the left wing organization known as Nobel gave him a peace prize for nothing. The people they looked over to give it to him were a joke. Please American guy do not use Nobel as anything more than a political joke.

          • You cannot be so naive as to believe that the researchers working in US universities are all Americans. These researchers are recruited out of their home countries from across the world based on the amazing work they have already done. Further, some of those Nobel prize winning American scientists in medicine have shared the prize with other scientists from other countries because they work jointly. Rarely, can one scientist take credit for any medical break through. An example of this are those different people who developed the HIV vaccine; another is those who are currently mapping the genome for autism. How many scientists do you think have made small breakthroughs throughout the years on these projects yet one or two will be rewarded with the final “Nobel”.

            Of course recruiting of physicians and medical staff goes on by American hospitals in Canadian universities and nursing schools. There is global shortage of physicians and nurses. The US needs the staff. Don’t say it does not happen because I worked with a young married couple who were recruited upon finishing their specialties. At the same time, Canada actively recruits staff from the UK and South Africa. Everybody is doing it. Oh and by the way, thank you we in Calgary recently got a top pediatric neurologist specializing in epilepsy from the US. Hey, we are happy to recruit your best, just like you are happy to take ours.

          • How is your murder and suicide rate these days? How about assault and rape? Oh ya its wayyyyyy higher than ours. You suck, deal with it.

          • Anon is the typical Ugly American.

  28. **1)** The US has higher quality of life than Canada and scores higher on the Human Development Index:

    http://internationalliving.com/2010/02/quality-of-life-2010/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Human_Development_Index#Very_high_human_development

    **2)** Americans are more likely to graduate high school than Canadians:

    http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/details/education/high-school-graduation-rate.aspx

    **3)** The US has the highest education attainment out of any major industrialized nation. Americans are more likely to receive higher education than Canadians. Pg 42 of this PDF:

    http://www.educationalpolicy.org/pdf/Global2005.pdf

    United States: 31%

    Canada: 26%

    **4)** The US dominates in academic performance. So not only does the US get more of its population into higher education, but the education we receive is the best in the world, and results in vastly superior academic performance in all broad subject fields when ranked among world universities:

    Natural Sciences and Mathematics

    http://www.arwu.org/FieldSCI2010.jsp

    Engineering/Technology and Computer Sciences

    http://www.arwu.org/FieldENG2010.jsp

    Life and Agriculture Sciences

    http://www.arwu.org/FieldLIFE2010.jsp

    Clinical Medicine and Pharmacy

    http://www.arwu.org/FieldMED2010.jsp

    Social Sciences

    http://www.arwu.org/FieldSOC2010.jsp

    **5)** The US is the most technologically advanced nation on earth:

    http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/eco_tec_ind-economy-technology-index

    Canada is ranked 12th, and would be lower if it didn’t border the US.

    **6)** The US has the highest disposable income per capita in the world:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_average_wage#Methodology

    • Well….your grads have a very low level of expectancy when it comes to world knowledge (but they are very good at knowing their own country’s propaganda). It is not at all tough to graduate from an American public school. Pretty sad, actually.
      If quality of life means over-fed, over-entertained, and under-informed, then YES, you certainly have a higher level of (cholesterol and dead brain cells?)?
      I’ll put any graduate of one of your high schools against pretty well any graduate of an industrialized nation and (if the questions are not about the U.S.), your little grads will fail miserably.
      You need to look outside of your borders and learn about the world, sport. You guys just are not keeping up.

      • Nothing you said is true. All you’re doing is mindlessly regurgitate the propaganda that you’re spoon-fed in Canada designed to help you feel better about your inferiority complex.

        You Canadians should be ashamed of yourselves. Your entire world view is based on lies designed to help you cope with just being that country that borders the US.

        ” You guys just are not keeping up.”

        That’s funny, because the US leads the world in academia. You’d know that if you actually read the links I posted.

        It’s funny how you Canadians are so determined for pride that you will just lie to your hearts’ content.

        You’re the most brainwashed nation in the developed world, easily. I bet you’re one of the Canadians who thinks that Canadians burned the White House down in the War of 1812. No other developed nation rewrites history. They don’t have to, Canada does, because you really have nothing to be proud of. You need to fabricate reasons to be proud.

        • This thread saddens me – it appears the writers at Macleans got exactly what they were looking for – anti-Canadian and anti-American slanderous “discussions” for the sole purpose of helping them sell this rag they call writing/journalism. What about all us Canadians and Americans who have direct family – blood- in either country? I don’t hate my American Uncles, Aunts, Grandparents and cousins – I love them regardless of nationality (the new opiate of the masses in my opinion anyways…). Every country has its share of positives and areas for improvement – the United States and Canada are not exempt from this truth. Personally, I will be celebrating July 1st and July 4th with ALL of my family.

        • I don’t suppose you even once considered that you are getting all your stats from American companies which are bound to be not only biased towards the US but also old? latest UN stats have Canada at number 8 on thepercentage of population under 21 graduating from high school with the good ole USA at number 37. then again you have all those home schooled kids learning only what’s in the bible, yet graduating

        • tha is just not true. in fact, it took until the 1980s for Canadian school children NOT to take American history at least every second year from grade 6 to grade 13. the history text books were written in the USA

        • Hey tard, the UN ranks countries every year and for the past 30 years Canada has been #! place int he world to live around 8 times and never lower than 5th. The US has never even been 5th ONCE and is usually around 8-10th. But let me guess that is all a lie to because everything that goes against your crazy bs US ra-ra bias is a lie right?
          YOU are theexact reason why the world hates Americans.

      • All you people who compare US with Canada, have you lived in US and if so where? It depends on where you compare. You have to live somewhere to compare it to another that you lived in. I can tell you that handsdown the DC metropolitan area is better than both Montreal and the GTA in Ontario, and for many reasons that were cited above. But I’m not going to say the same for the entire USA because its impossible to live everywhere and thus have credibility to judge everything.

    • Canada is ranked number 2 in the most educated countries of the world while the US is ranked 5 ( http://finance.yahoo.com/news/most-educated-countries-world-102232490.html ). Now let’s compare stats from the CIA fact book:

      Canada ( https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/ca.html )

      US ( https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html )

      US- Infant mortality Rate: 5.9/1000
      Canada- Infant mortality Rate: 4.78/1000
      US- Net Migration:3.64 migrant(s)/1,000 population country comparison to the world: 29
      Canada- Net Migration:5.65 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2013 est.)
      country comparison to the world: 22
      US- Life Expectancy: total population: 78.62 years country comparison to the world: 51
      Canada- Life Expectancy:total population: 81.57 years country comparison to the world: 13

      The stats are there do I really need to continue?

  29. Everywhere in the USA, I have the freedom to speak any language I so choose, make a sign in any language I so choose and conduct business in any language I so choose. My government doesn’t try to stop me and if any local government tried, they would never get away with it.

    • If the PQ gets its way, Canada will be a lot smaller in the near future.

    • as long as you don’t dare suggest there is no god, or claim that evolution is fact. most American schools still teach creation as science

      • “most American schools still teach creation as science”

        Here you are lying again.

        • Is it your job to go around finding Canadian nationalist articles and pick a fight by insulting Canada in the comments section? Because all that I have read of this argument is completely unnecessary and full of random and dubious statistics.

          As far as I can tell most Canadians are perfectly happy with their nationality and do not feel inferior towards America, as seen in the various comments stating that they don’t like this articles because it compares Canada to America.

          That being said America is our neighbor and deeply entwined into our culture and economy. We watch American T.V, comment on their politics, and are surrounded by their products. Not to mention that our history has very similar origins. If Macleans tried comparing us to another country it would be boring because, well, we are Canadian, North American, and other countries are just…different.

          Relax, sit back and enjoy the internet.

          • Dude has no life. He needs to go shoot more guns or salute his flag a little more. What a complete loser.

        • Yep that’s what we Canadians do.

    • You seem to forget the history of the Usa, they close the french school in Louisiana, ban french in Louisiana despite the fact that they promised Napoléon to protect the right of the french people in Louisiana when it was sold to the USA

  30. An article like this is distinctly unCanadian.

    • ..Sorry.. Seriously though, many people are just not accustomed to hearing Canadians’ toot their own horn. Both the USA and Canada have positive qualities and there is nothing wrong with either country embracing and singing their own phrases. This survey is simply a fun way to remind Canadians and the world that there are many positive, unique attributes about Canada and her people. We should be proud.

      • They’re more comparisons than attributes because see you can say “we made great movies such a blah blah blah.” But in this article it says ” we’re BETTER because we made these movies.” Seriously.

  31. I have to admit, this article made me feel very uncomfortable – it was very UN-Canadian. Ironic that one of the book reviews in the same issue is of a book that chastises the U.S. for thinking they are exceptional and above every other country.

    Overall, it was an embarassing article and infantile to compare it to our southern neighbour. Just how insecure was the author of this piece?

    • Based on my experience in this country of Canada, he was probably from India, Iran, or Poland and not insecure at all.

    • Well he must feel ashamed after reading these comments… everyone is about at each others throats… and for what… a few minutes of false pride? All of you open your eyes, this article is Yellow Journalism and is meant to exaggerate the subject…. we all need to just calm down and stop with the ignorant insults…

  32. bring back Wayne and Shuster!!

    • sorry, dude, they haven’t learned to bring back the dead yet

  33. We are fortunate to live in this country, Canada, and we should act as people who have been so fortunate. Let us correct the greed at the higher level of some businesses and the corruption at the higher levels of some governments here; with that we can surely help our homeless, our underprivileged, our abused, and our young people studying for the future Canada.
    We can afford it. Actually, we cannot afford not to do it. Happy Canada Day to all of us.

    • Well, as you say, in this country we do have “our homeless, our underprivileged, our abused, and our young people ”

      So, not everyone is so fortunate to live here. Just the privileged ones.

  34. Thanks for the article! I thought it was very cute and full of humour.

    • Ikr It was so funny.

  35. How very “unCanadian” of Maclean’s to outline the USA’s faults to make us look/feel better about our nation. I’m pretty sure that’s classified as a form bullying. There are other ways to be proud and patriotic without putting down another nation. We Canadians are not an insecure crowd, so we don’t need to compare us to our neighbours to feel better about ourselves. Not very Canadian at all. Sorry, just my opinion. ;)

  36. This is disgusting. I am a proud Canadian but I don’t feel that way because I think that I’m better than anyone else. I’m proud of what we have. All this article does is fuel a feud; focusing on our differences.

    Shame, shame, shame, MacLean’s.

  37. I actually read the entire article and then threw up a little bit. Typical Canadian envy from the liberal bastions of Toronto. What are the sources for the surveys and did anyone at MacLeans actually talk to anyone outside of Toronto ( like maybe Calgary?)
    The rebuttals to most of the facts(?) given could fill up an entire hard drive.
    The entire drivel could be reduced to two points:
    What percentage of Canadians would like to live in or become American citizens?
    What percentage of Americans would like to live in or become Canadian citizens?
    Most of the statistics (?) given are oversimplifications or baldass lies in order to promote the feel good “see, we really are great” vision that the MacLeans myopia has to promote in an effort to remain relevent.
    27 years ago, I and my family voted with our feet and moved south and have never regretted it for a minute.

  38. canadian identity = not american. so sad.

  39. My grand mother was American, I could easily get the American citizenship, but I decide to live in Montréal and I am French-Canadian, I don’t ask myself if I am different from an Américan, I speak french , I have a complete different life (food,song, movies etc…).

    If English-Canadian always have to ask themselves if the are different from an American it is because the difference is not big.

    So you want to be a real Canadien, learn French.

    • I did learn how to speak French, but it was in high school in Ontario, and whenever I spoke it in Montreal, they would pretend not to understand.

  40. …. and several reasons to hide my head in shame. Necrophilia? Father-daughter incest?? School girl stripper?? More F-bombs?? God have mercy! These are below the BOTTOM of the pile.

  41. Fecal sexualist and Darwinian bs propaganda piece

  42. I’ve got 99 problems but a hoser ain’t one…

  43. Americans didn’t invent baseball, it’s a mutated form of Rounders.

    • I agree that baseball was probably copied from rounders, which I played as a kid in England before coming here. And I played netball. Guess what Americans call that.

      But Beachville, Ontario claims to have hosted the first baseball game, in the early 1800s, a year before the one at Cooperstown in the US, and commemorate it every year.

      So I don’t know where they are getting their facts from, for this piece of nonsense – US stats? No authors are listed. But it is just a news article, so doesn’t require sources to be listed.

  44. ok, this was hard to read. Only about 30% of it is really worth “bragging” about. And some of the stats … I mean it sounds like Canada has far less F3 Tornados, but if you do the math its 5% in Canada vs. 3% in the US.

  45. Do we really need to publish this kind of stuff ??? Really ???? This is exactly what we accuse American’s of doing – propping up themselves by beating their chests. After 146 years can we please just get past the “little country” syndrome ? Great countries don’t have to convince themselves or anyone else that they are great. They just are.

    • Common, they did this for Canada Day. What harm is there in amusingly tooting your horn once a year on your national holiday. Live a little.

  46. Whatever used to be good about this country has been cancelled out with just one word: Harper.

    • Correction….Pierre Trudeau.

      • Trudeau was awesome. Harper is a conservative duckweed.

  47. You Canucks have a nice little country up there. Too bad you have such a big inferiority complex, eh.

  48. 101. Canada has a “Language Police”, which nobody in the US has ever considered ….

  49. “(70) We attract more immigrants: Canada gets 5.65 per 1,000 people, compared to
    the U.S., with 3.64 per 1,000.”

    I have recently become interested in the immigration issue
    after reading this one-sided piece – Health cuts tell refugees they aren’t
    welcome:
    http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2013/06/27/health_cuts_tell_refugees_they_arent_welcome.html

    That said, why would the ability to attract more immigrants
    make one country better than another? And is it rates per 1000 that counts, or
    actual numbers. Based on the numbers 5 per thousand for Canada (popn 35 million)
    and 3 for the US (316 million), that works out to 175,000 immigrants for Canada,
    948,000 for the US.

  50. Then why do so many Canadians head south to find their success, fame
    and fortune? Canada remains a footnote in world history. America, despite
    its faults, is a giant .

    • That is such an ignorant statement.

  51. Americans walk on the moon. Canadians skate on ice.

  52. Embracing homosexuality more than Americans do and being more open to legalizing marijuana more than they are is a matter of opinion. Some would say that makes them better and us worse.Canada is far too liberal. So many points in this article are just ridiculous.

  53. Canada, you are a great country country, no doubt. But an article like this only confirms much of Europe’s stereotype of Canadians. Canadians’ identity is based not on what they are, but what they are not (and that is of course, Americans.)

    You don’t always have to compare yourself to the south.

  54. If it is so great living in Canadah, why do your stars move to the U.S. By the way, I guess Canadians don’t realize that they are Americans, since they live on the American continent like we do. Duh.

    • WOW, i amh impressedh by the level of geographyh, DUH.
      Americans don’t have nothing good about themselves, so they steal Canadian heroism stories, and make them their own: Argo movie.

    • The U.S has more money and a stronger film-making industry. It is also a different country, we are both in NORTH AMERICA, Canada just chose a more original name ;)

  55. #17. “We accept homosexuality”

    This was based on a Pew study that asked the question “should society tolerate homosexuals” but (deliberately?) published the results as responses to a different question; “should society accept homosexuality”.

    Unfortunately, despite the massive establishment push in the West towards normalization of homosexual behavior, a majority still view it as a paraphilia. Canada’s figures are the same as the U.S.’s, and outside of the Nordic countries, Europe is actually more hostile than any anglospheric country, including the U.S.
    The LGBT community still has a lot of work ahead of it.

  56. Love this article but archaeologists don’t dig up dinosaurs! That would be Paleontologists…

    • That’s what I was thinking!

  57. I don’t like the idea of belittle-ing someone, in order to make yourself feel important , this is un-Canadian,

  58. While this article obviously contains some
    facts and makes a few good points about the differences between Canada
    and the United States, this is overall a pretty stupid article, for
    reasons that I shall explain. First of all, how about listing
    a few areas where Canada trails behind America or other countries?
    Surely there are a few areas where Canada is lacking, right? Would that
    be too much for Canada’s fragile ego?

    The second problem with
    this article is the more serious one. It’s all fun and games to compare
    Canada to the U.S., as the U.S. is a safe target. But something tells
    me that if Canada tried comparing itself to some of the crappier third
    world countries out there, then that article would never be published by
    a mainstream paper. Likewise if the U.S. tried to compared itself, in
    detail, to some crappier third world countries. That would never be
    published for mainstream audiences, because suddenly that comparison
    would no longer be “fun” and “patriotic”, but would then become “racist”
    and “ignorant”, of course.

    So until Canada starts comparing
    itself to crappy third world nations with the same fervor that it likes
    to compare itself to the U.S., then Canada continues to be full of crap,
    as usual.

  59. wut…this article…just disgraced all Canadians. Although there are some facts in it, but just by posting this article made all Canadians seem “self-centered”(Thanks for trying to represent us Canadian, but we don’t need this kind of shyt). As a Canadian, I’m disappointed at how people try to make themselves look better by comparing their strengths to someone’s weaknesses. Everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses, so why judge if you yourself(the writer) are not perfect? >:(

    Thou shalt not judge.

  60. To write something so stupid in a “national” magazine, shows our insecurity and lack of self-confidence vis-à-vis the Americans. I am sure that Americans don’t need to be told that they are superior – they know it. Most of them don’t give a hoot about Canada and probably don’t even know where it is. And those who know something, know that Canada is a client-state of the USA, no more – no less.

  61. Disappointing article. Nothing new or enlightening. Half these reasons are a joke. The one that did stand out to me the most was the employment laws (holidays, maternity leave and paid days off).

  62. In our ongoing endeavour of finding our identity, this article enforces the notion that the only thing we can say what makes us Canadian is that we’re not an American. If we’re going to talk about what makes our country great, let’s discuss stand-alone reasons: like how Calgary’s citizens (and the rest of the country) came together during the floods; how our country, not without its hiccups, brings together many cultures into a functioning one; or how our various landscapes makes us one of the most beautiful countries to travel in. Focusing on the flaws of others isn’t going to convince anyone that we’re better.

  63. What an embarrassing cover for a Canadian magazine! (July 8, 2013) Why not shout “Nyah, nyah!!. We have more water than you do!”

    If an American publication were to print an article detailing 100 reasons why it’s better to be American than Canadian, we would be oh, so offended.
    I have relatives who chose to become Americans. I choose to spend my winters in a warm American city. I enjoy buying a bottle of wine for 1/3 or less than it would cost in Canada. I love shopping where sales staff actually WANT to help me. I enjoy being called “Hon” by waitresses. I LOVE big parades where every school has a marching band. I enjoy having locals say “We love Canadians. Do you like us?” Yes, I do. Am I glad that my great, greats were United Empire Loyalists? Yes. Would I want to be a citizen of any country but Canada? No. However, 99 comparatives that disparage a neighbor/neighbour displays not only bad manners but a meanness of spirit. Grow up, Macleans.

  64. This is probably one of the dumbest articles I’ve ever seen. 99 reasons why it’s better to be Canadian? Geez, Maclean’s, why are you wasting everone’s time with this? It’s ridiculous “surveys” like this (note #46) say more about our INSECURITIES vis-a-vis our southern neighbours than anything about what it means to be Canadian (which, btw, is more than just drinking mediocre beer, mediocre coffee, sitting at the cottage all summer, and watcing hockey in the winter).

  65. I’m totally embarassed by this article as a Canadian who chooses to live inthe United States. This article is an embarrassment to Canadians and you don’t represent us Macleans. Shame on your staff for their arrogance and stupidity.

  66. I think people are taking this article a bit too seriously. This was a fun way of showing our racial superiority. HAIL HARPER!

  67. My God, this can be an article on a magazine, it is the most biased article I have ever read, shame on Canadians to even publish and read this crap and I am a Canadian. How can you compare 2 countries? Why do like back-stabbing U.S. so much, this must be our most popular hobby…trash talk U.S….wake up, learn the good and bad points about each country instead of one way comparison.

  68. Poutine, how does one forget about poutine?

  69. Canada is the best country in the World!

  70. I honestly don’t think the margins of percentages are big enough to call Canada better. And half of these are opinions haha

  71. I wish the US Media had a similar law as Canada’s CRTC’s ..that it is illegal to “knowingly” broadcast false information.

  72. I am an American who was born in Canada to missionary parents. Although I am an American citizen I have gone back to visit my birthplace in Saskatchewan and found Canada to be a beautiful country filled with warm and friendly people. I have considered moving back there, which I understand would not be too difficult as I was born in Canada. Has anyone done that or know how to go about it?

  73. What a load of nationalistic crap. I also love the hypocrisy. They say the maple leaf is loved over seas, but you also claim Americans put maple leaves on their backpacks when they go overseas, which means that actually people over seas love AMERICANS not canadians.

  74. I sort of wish my great granddaddy hadn’t moved to the us.

  75. LOL, what a stupid article. Look, I have nothing wrong with Canada, I in fact love Canada. But this makes Fox and CNN look like honest news sources. The point about braving the cold better made me laugh for so long, lol. Yes, you do better in the cold because your used to it. Let’s see how you’d fare in those Southern Summers!

  76. Shouldn’t we be striving to be better worldwide. If beating our southern neighbours is all that counts, maybe we are more like them than the above suggests. From this article it seems Canada is also one of the most concieded countries. C’mon chocolate taste, first lets forget that it’s subjective, and then, umm, Europe.

  77. This is really starting to get rude. The fact that I run in to articles like this daily comparing some other country to the US is absolutely disgusting. As a US citizen, I feel insulted and judged. The US is unjustly picked on, and it really hurts me. I don’t know where this deep hatred comes from. The US is ten times more beautiful than Canada. What in the world has the US done that other countries haven’t that warrants constant and merciless insults and hatred from people outside. The way that people always make lists about why Canada is better than the US or why Britain is better than the US is really hypocritical. Oh, so people call us chauvinistic and full of ourselves, yet I don’t see much of these lists coming from an Americans perspective. I would much rather live here. Canada just doesn’t have the diversity, beauty, and friendliness that the US has. It has it, just not as much. This is the most jingoistic thing I have ever seen in my life, so why are we accused of jingoism? As a US citizen, I feel very upset by this constant unfair treatment of the US. Apparently the US is good for nothing then. The US is just the worst country in the world, despite it being a major economic, technological, cultural, and military leader. If a US citizen ever wrote an article like this, it would be shot down by the rest of the world. You honestly know nothing about the US. To decide to make 99 stupid reasons as to why every other country is better than the US is chauvinistic beyond belief. Maybe the US should just break ties with all of the countries it’s allied with if this is the kind of treatment they get from them time and time again. It’s despicable. And let me tell you, the whole thing about them living in bigger houses and being richer is absolutely false.

    PS. The US isn’t called “America the beautiful” for nothing. USA means beautiful country in Chinese.

  78. Sounds like you Canadians have to try really hard to convince yourselves that Canada is better than America. In America we just KNOW we are better than you, and we prove it every day. Canada? Psssh. Get real. When people study history 1000 years from now, which country is going to be classified as one of the greatest counties ever to have existed, Canada or the United States? We all know the answer to that, including all you retarded Canadians, as much as it may hurt you to admit it to yourselves. Hell, most people don’t even know crap about Canada TODAY, much less 1000 years from now. I guess it must hurt to be the pipsqueak on the block, Nobody can blame you for trying so hard to build up your self esteem. But you’re just not a GREAT COUNTRY like the United States is, and you never will be. It must be a tough pill to swallow, but there it is. You live in a country that has no real bearing on the world stage. A powerless country. A pitiful, pathetic little brother to your neighbor, the great United States of America. It must really suck to know that your very existence as a country is dictated by the whim of the United States. The minute we need your resources we’ll take your country over. It wouldn’t be hard. We could crush you like a bug. And we will. Eventually.

    • Wow, you stated absolutely no real facts in your whole shitty, arrogant paragraph. The only reason America will be remembered is because all we do is go to war (not something to be proud of since we can’t keep our hands clean), fight about politics (which wouldn’t happen if our government did their job), and stab eachother in the back. America has a dog-eat-dog attitute. Where would you want to raise your kid? In a place that gets no attention (because it is a peaceful and beautiful country) or a place that gets nothing but NEGATIVE attention. Americans are constantly fucking ourselves in the ass. So shut up, dude. You make americans like me wish we were canadian.

  79. While much of this Canada does have bragging rights to, bragging about geography, something outside of anyone’s control is obnoxious. It’s almost Texan in attitude. In fact, it is Texas in attitude. And I’m a Texan.

    Also, why didn’t you guys mention Eidos Montreal? The best gaming company!

  80. Oh look, all of these reasons are almost exactly identical to what America and any other country thinks about themselves.

  81. I totally agree with this article and video. Canadians are much more friendlier then the US.

  82. i refuse to read this article. Mainly, because the indigenous communities are not represented at all. It’s only better to be canadian, if your not a visible minority.

  83. it’s funny because Americans have to come read a Canadian magazine if they don’t feel like reading complete crap.

  84. Americans vs Canadians doesn’t make sense from the beginning because you both hail from the same ancestors. You even have some Canadians who moved to the US and Americans who moved to Canada a long time ago, so you guys are both mixed with one another’s people. Second you don’t need to compare yourselves to others around you. Anyone can be happy anywhere, it’s up to you where you find happiness. You can’t cram everyone in one group, even people in the same family are happy in different places. I’m not from either country by the way but I’ve lived in both my entire life

  85. I wonder how many americans know what canada is

  86. Canadians are better people period!

  87. After reading this article I thought it was interesting to see the differences. I’m traveling to Canada on Monday and thought I’d read up on the culture in hopes to not offend anyone erroneously. Then I read the comments which I now know that I’ve been lied to . I was under the impression that Canadians were more humbled and well-mannered than Americans yet I would never stereotype an entire nation as many posters have here. Many of our flaws arise from poor political leadership. I as an American, do not condone many of the choices made but unfortunately must endure the reprocussions. I believe statistically Canada is far better off then the US and have made significant contributions to better serve the masses. I present that comment you as a compliment. Does that make me a less arrogant American? More humble than Canadians? Absolutely not. As a human being, I prefer to treat others how I would like to be treated. As an American, I can give you my word I will not slander you or talk ill towards your country as I know we all have our bad apples. On my visit I will be polite and respectful to everyone. And should you ever visit the US I wish you safe traveling. And as popular belief may lead you to think, I an American citizen, hope for the sake of all humanity, wish for the best regardless of your nationality.

    • Please don’t judge an entire country by an internet comment board…no country would look good by that measure. I am a Canadian and love living here, but I love our neighbor and enjoy visiting, vacationing, and shopping there.

  88. THE CANADIAN inferiority complex is very funny.

  89. Why can’t we all just get along?

  90. World peace <3

  91. You say that Basketball was invented in Canada but
    technically it was not… Although James Naismith was born in Canada, he was
    living in Springfield Massachusetts when he invented the game for the
    university, so it basically was invented in the U.S. … but other than that GO
    MONTREAL! JE L’AIME!

  92. But yet, you guys come back every year and spend your money. ;)

  93. The article is as mediocre as everything else Canadian.

    Should not have mentioned the arts at all, for example. You got it all backwards.

    Finally got a modern opera house building in the XXI century but nothing worth a mention to show in it. Same with the museums – more concerned with “how do I look?” than with what’s inside.

    Jack Diamond, who built it: born November 8, 1932, in Piet Retief , South Africa, received a Bachelor of Architecture degree from University of Cape Town in 1956. Received a Master of Arts degree from University of Oxford in 1958. Received Master of Architecture from University of Pennsylvania in 1962. Moved to Toronto to found Master of Architecture Program in 1964.

    Jim Carrey became a star thanks to Hollywood, not the other way around.

    “16. We’re richer” is a laugh. More like Canada’s average household net worth of $240,000 is lower than America’s, at $320,000. Google “Canadian car buyers blocked from cheaper U.S. prices” as an example. For starters. You got enough of the low end mass consumption products but anything slightly more advanced – you either pay a lot higher prices locally, if it’s available in Canada at all, or you have to order from the US and pray they ship to Canada.

    The only thing Canadians really excel in is flattering themselves and being big-mouthed to try hard to be noticed outside of Canada. Doesn’t work well yet. But keep chanting the mantras in the article and keep saying “sweet” another thousand times.

  94. there you go, the pic says it all, the land of fatties, 3 in 4 Canadian girls are fat

  95. I love Canada, I am very glad to be Canadian, but I wish we didn’t have this compulsion to try and get one over the US. That kind of pettiness detracts from all of the other great qualities; instead of self-congratulation, let’s focus on continuing to progress and improve both domestically and abroad. Real champions leave the talking to others.

  96. this is stupid…………… at least im not canadian!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  97. the reason why we have less crime, murders etc… is because we HAVE LESS PEOPLE. if you give us 300 million i can guarantee you (give or take a few) that Canada will be almost/just as bad as our southern counterparts. We still have lobbyists, we still have monopolizing corporations (tells, rogers, bell etc…), and we still have scandals. The only country we can rival against (in terms of education, government, etc…) is the US. Hence this article.

    • *Facepalm*
      It was counting per 100,000 and not sheer numbers.

  98. Good article. I really don’t mind paying more taxes. I like the feeling of helping my country, knowing that if get il or lose my job I’m not going to be out on the street, and knowing my children will be well educated.

  99. I guess it’s exaggeration to call the US the greatest cultural superpower. In the term of cultural heritage US is inferior to nearly any small European nation.

  100. I still think America’s a better place to live in.
    The Canadian prime minister is against immigrants
    The taxes are so high in Canada
    Barely any shopping websites that ship to Canada
    Better university and education in the States
    Awful weather
    Horrible mayor
    The process of citizenship extended to 6 years for Canada

    • There’s more than one mayor in Canada, you know.

    • Actually, most of what you are saying is wrong.
      According to statistics, Canada is more welcoming to foreigners than the USA.
      The taxes are higher for good reasons such as free health care, higher standards of living and more.
      There are lots of shopping websites that ship to Canada and if you can’t find the product you’re looking for on that website, you can always look on websites like eBay or Amazon.ca which both ship to Canada.
      There are many of great Canadian post-secondary institutions such as McGill, U of T, and UBC, which are all by the way, world class, top 30.
      Yes, in Canda, the weather is cold in the winter, so if you’re going to bitch all day about the weather, then Canada isn’t for you. But, one place in Canada to escape the cold is Vancouver. On average, the weather there never goes under 0º celsius. However it rains A LOT!
      There are multiple mayors throughout Canada some of whom are very good, and if you’re referring to Rob Ford, its most likely he’ll be voted out at the next election in October 2014.
      It actually takes about 3-4 years to become a citizen in Canada, whereas in the USA it takes about 5 years.
      So yeah, you were wrong…about everything (some of what you said was just opinion).

  101. Usa has better army and canada does not decide any military attacks and what not without telling the u.s we are all around stronger and more powerful

  102. I’m curious, I’m an American and I’ve really been debating whether it would be better to stay in the US or to consider living in Canada. I’m still unclear on all the details and how the pros and cons weigh out- but so far Canada does seem better in a lot of aspects. Is gay marriage legal or just supported? And is the healthcare really covered by taxes? Is the education expensive? Would is be easier for a young couple to make ends meet in Canada vs. the US? I’m not too familiar with all the details so feel free to comment. Are there any proud Canadians who could give me some insight on how accurate this article is? :) I would really appreciate it!

  103. At the end of the day, Canada is still just America’s hat.

    • A hat without every citizen in debt ;)

  104. Number 14!

  105. Yankified- to- the- hilt, even USA accents for Petes sake!!! All real estate is USA owned, Coldwell Banker, Century 21, Re- Max, and as are Malls, Shops, supermarkets, fast food, sports TV shows Movies vehicles all US or Asian, those crap greeting cards! all US- owned with vile uncouth US misspellings.
    Most Canyanks with money or fame flee to the USA!! Canucks get to spew- out,,, He is Canadian! really? how can you tell? the US accent? Hot warm beer wine at theft prices sold in Union/ government cartels in 2014!!! sent to die in US wars, salute like your bosses in the USA… wear US- style helmets uniforms in the Canuck army! US lemon planes, US.
    Most of your cities like Asian or Black cites in the USA, Overruled and told what to do and think, no referendums no propositions a four- year dictatorship forced dying language shoved up your backsides, a red rag liberal flag the Frogs hate and never use.
    Forever tooting their own horn while lapping the US bag all the way.

  106. This is a good article, I love Canada, and I couldn’t imagine myself living anywhere else. However, the fact that we have to compare ourselves to America just defeats the purpose of writing something like this in the first place. Canadians need to stop looking to the south as a standard to measure up to because – as outlined by this article – the US is falling a little short. Don’t get me wrong, the USA is a fantastic country, but we do have to compare ourselves to them in a sort of pissing contest. It makes Canada, and the US look bad, and we should all just be trying to get along. What we really should take away from this article is that Canada needs to start making a name for itself, something that has a little more depth than that we’re nice and north of the US. If we really are the better country, then we should also be the bigger person too.

    • *but we DON’T have to compare ourselves…

  107. Canada is still under British rule. Your head of state is British, lol. Say what you will about the USA, but atleast we fought the British for our freedom. Your freedom came, when the British Empire fell, and transitioned to the common wealth of nations. Yet, you’re still not 100% free. The Queen apoints a Gov General that has rule in your parliment. The Gov General has also disolved your parliment 3 times in 7 years, lol. The queen also has to aprove your prime minaster. And if WW3 happens, the Queen can only declare war for Canada. Yeah, that Canada!! Even the Queen is on your money. Without the UK, Canada wouldn’t have an identity. Atleast the USA has somewhat of identity. I’m sorry Canada, but French Fries and gravy don’t count, lol. Learn to live with the USA, North Michigan. hahaha.

  108. This is the worst article I’ve ever read, it is insulting to Americans, and is completely wrong.

  109. Look, lets all say were all equal cause were all human k.This article is a joke,.I’m Canadian,American,Asian,and this still embarrasses me.I respect everyone for who they are……

  110. Canada is irrelevant. Stop acting like you are important! I’ve lived in both countries and Canada is a joke. The people always compare themselves to Americans and talk trash about the United States. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but Americans could care less about Canadians. Americans don’t ever compare themselves to Canadians. Where is this fake rivalry coming from? Stop comparing your little country, who has less people than the state of California, to the most powerful nation in the world.

    • America is pathetic. With a national debt upwards of 17 trillion dollars and a credit rating that is constantly being downgraded, the American economy is headed nowhere. Canada supplies a massive portion of America’s drinking water, and it’s electricity. America needs canada, but canada does NOT need America. You guys think that the solution to gun violence is more guns, whereas we Canadians realized the awful logic in that solution long ago. We Canadians outlive Americans by an average of three years. We are healthier, wealthier, happier and smarter. America spends a significant and ever growing portion of it’s annual budget on paying back interest on it’s debt so it doesn’t default. Soon America will be so far in debt, it won’t even be able to keep up with the minimum payments! You Americans have thrown away your sons and daughters lives in the pointless Iraq war. Iraq is no better off now than it was before you idiots invaded! You’ve thrown away the lives of your next generation for nothing. America has ruined it’s relationship with other nations in the past decade trying to get everyone to fight with you in your pointless Iraq war. Canada said no, we will support this silly pointless war. Now America is looked down upon in the international community.

      Canadians are also more intelligent than you Americans. Less than a third of you believe in evolution? Seriously? Do you just put your head in the sand and ignore science? Honestly, America is going downhill quickly. Your economy is pathetic. Canada has one of the most diverse and sustainable economies of the developed world. America wastes it’s money on it’s military. It spent over 200 million dollars to build each one of its 200 f-22 fighter jets, which have never been used in combat. It spent around 3 billion dollars each on it’s oversized stealth bombers, building about 20 of them. It’s pathetic. The latest waste of money is the pathetic oversized f-35 fighter bomber. With a rapidly rising cost, it will prove to be another massive waste of money, money that the country doesn’t have! For the love of god people, Americans struggle to pay for their medical bills, and some struggle to eat three meals a day, yet their government spends billions of dollars on oversized jets that will probably never be used in combat? It’s absurd!

  111. Oh, how I want to be a Canadian. I need to find a nice (what am I saying, thy are all nice) Canadian woman and settle down in the Great White North.

  112. And even after reading every single one of your reasons as to why Canada is better, I will still happily never consider moving to your country. I couldn’t find a single reason in your list that I could even bother to care about. Sorry. US’s better.

  113. OMG. You forgot to mention that Canadians rank #1 as “worlds weirdest people”… Also, Justin Bieber? Puleeeeeease. Also Canada ranks as #1 in the “chip on the shoulder” category; why is it that Canadians can never give themselves props without comparing and contrasting with the USA on everything? Look how we’re better than THEM! Look how THEY suck!! Classic underdog syndrome.

    I’d love to see how Canada compares, and what it looks like, 20 years from now after allowing unfettered and rabid immigration from the most destitute places in the world..

    However, I must say that the fact that Canada is one of the most beautiful countries in terms of the natural world was left out; I think this may be it’s best quality.

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