Donuts, hockey, tax cuts and Afghanistan

The quintessential speech of Stephen Harper’s premiership?

harperhortonsBelow is a transcript of the Prime Minister’s speech today at the Tim Hortons Innovation Centre in Oakville.

If I ever get round to writing a book about this time in Ottawa, I may very well argue that this, in content, setting and context, is the quintessential speech of Stephen Harper’s premiership.

This is obviously a big day for the Tim Hortons family, returning to your Canadian roots after 14 years away. Now, I agree, the United States is a great place to visit, but let’s face it, there is no place like our home and native land, there is no place like Canada. I also suspect that there will be a lot of Canadians actually surprised to hear that Tims is moving its headquarters back home. Your company is such a fixture here on the street corners and in the malls that I’m not sure many canadians would believe you actually ever moved away, but this company’s success over the past four decades is truly impressive.

The numbers speak for themselves, from one location in 1964 in Hamilton, Ontario to over 3,000 today. Tim Hortons has become the largest publicly traded restaurant chain in Canada. These figures stand as a tribute to the talented company leadership and staff here at headquarters and in the field who have built Tim Hortons throughout the years. Give all yourselves a big round of applause for that.

Now, if I were to look back to the early days, I think there were a couple of things about Tim Hortons that really connected with Canadians. First, of course, was the name and reputation of the cofounder, the great Toronto Maple Leaf defenseman Tim Horton. Baby boomers who grew up watching the original six remember him as one of the strongest and sturdiest blue liners ever to play the game. And, of course, for millions of long suffering Leaf fans across the country, the name Tim Horton conjures up their four Stanley Cups and the glory years of the 1960s.

So the name was very important, but there is another thing even millions more know. Millions more Canadian hockey parents like me know well that when it is 20 below and everyone is up for a 6 a.m. practice, nothing motivates the team more than a box of Timbits and nothing warms the parents in the stands better than a hot double-double. Perhaps no one said it better about Tim Hortons than the great Canadian author Pierre Berton. Let me quote. “In so many ways, the story of Tim Hortons is the essential Canadian story. It is the story of success and tragedy, of big dreams in small towns, of old fashioned values and tough-fisted business, of hard work and of hockey.”

Much of Tim Hortons’ success can be attributed to your commitment to the communities you serve. Thousands of underprivileged kids go to summer camps each year through the generosity of the Tim Hortons Children’s Foundation. Countless local and national sporting events from hockey to the Tim Hortons brier are supported by the company’s sponsorship, and Tims is appreciated by all Canadians, none any less than the brave men and women of the Canadian forces. I know this well because I’ve served coffee and iced caps to our soldiers on the Kandahar military base in Afghanistan.

In 1995, when Tim Hortons merged with an American firm, it effectively became an American company. That decision was undoubtedly made in the best interests of the company. But here we are today, 14 years later, because it is now in the best interests of the company to come back to Canada today. This decision, ladies and gentlemen, is all about the bottom line, and the bottom line is that Canada is now not just a great place to live, it is a great place to invest and to do business. When our government took office almost four years ago, we set out to make sure Canada would be not just one of the best places on earth to live and work but also to invest. When we took office in 2006, the corporate tax rate just at the federal level was over 22%. Today it is now down to 19% and it will fall to 15% by 2012 when it will be the lowest in the G7. Obviously numbers like that look pretty attractive to companies like Tims but just as attractive to the executives and managers who run the companies like this are the cuts we’ve made to personal taxes. Tax freedom day in this country now arrives 20 days earlier than when we took office thanks to the tax cuts introduced by Minister Flaherty. And soon, the federal tax burden in this country will fall to its lowest level in 50 years.

Lowering taxes has helped keep our economy relatively healthy even as we’ve been dragged into the global recession, and because of our strong long-term fiscal position, when the recovery comes, while others will be raising taxes to deal with their massive debt burdens, we will be able to continue lowering taxes. Canada’s economic future has rarely looked brighter. Our banks are secure, our markets are expanding, our stimulus is working, our taxes are falling, and our long-term fiscal position is solid. Tim Hortons’ return in the midst of the global recession is a clear signal that Canada is poised to come out of these tough times stronger than ever. The path we are on will draw home many other Canadian companies and businesses, it will attract highly skilled immigrants here from all over the world. In other words, Tim Hortons’ return is just the beginning of a new era of prosperity for Canada and there could be no fitting—no company more fitting to lead the way. So it is my great honour and indeed my pleasure to be the first to officially say welcome home Tim Hortons.




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Donuts, hockey, tax cuts and Afghanistan

  1. You may be right about that.

    Although I think it would need a nasty dig at Ignatieff to be considered his "quintesential" speech.

    I suppose, "the US is a great place to visit" may have been a subtle jab, but I'd expect something a bit more obvious.

  2. I'll wait here, till kcm comes along to tell me what Wherry meant in this blog.

    • He's a journalist — not your confessor.

    • Or was that a dig at kcm? Either way, lowering your nose would become you.

    • Actually Ed i told you what i thought Aaron meant. I did follow up with a post saying just that, but the machine ate it. – no need for the snarkiness…unless that's your bag.

  3. Tax freedom day in this country now arrives 20 days earlier than when we took office thanks to the tax cuts introduced by Minister Flaherty. And soon, the federal tax burden in this country will fall to its lowest level in 50 years.

    Coincidentally, as the deficit rises in lockstep….

    • And provincial and municipal taxes go higher and higher. A shrewd Harper is forcing the provinces and municipalities to increase taxes — HST in BC and Ontario and Charest's plan to increase the PST in Quebec, while Harper brags about cuts in federal taxes so that he can say that Ottawa does not have the revenue for any established or new social or health care programs.
      This is the Reform/Alliance fiscal conservative agenda in action. Destroy Ottawa's ability to tax and spend while allowing the well off provinces to tax and spend at their leisure while the have not provinces have to beg for larger equalization grants that Harper will refuse.

    • And provincial and municipal taxes go higher and higher. A shrewd Harper is forcing the provinces and municipalities to increase taxes — HST in BC and Ontario and Charest's plan to increase the PST in Quebec — while Harper brags about cuts in federal taxes so that he can say that Ottawa does not have the revenue for any established or new social or health care programs.
      This is the Reform/Alliance fiscal conservative agenda in action. Destroy Ottawa's ability to tax and spend while allowing the well off provinces to tax and spend at their leisure while the have not provinces have to beg for larger equalization grants that Harper will refuse.
      By the time Harper is finished with his fiscal conservative revolution Canadians will not recognize their country or its overly decentralized federal system.

      • Okay, if we want to talk of quintessentials, we definitely have one right here on the centralization/decentralization debate. A classical debate that has been with us since before confederation.

      • "Starving the beast" analysed:

        [ http://www.nber.org/papers/w13548 ]

        Synopsis:

        The hypothesis that decreases in taxes reduce future government spending is often cited as a reason for cutting taxes. However, because taxes change for many reasons, examinations of the relationship between overall measures of taxation and subsequent spending are plagued by problems of reverse causation and omitted variable bias. To deal with these problems, this paper examines the behavior of government expenditures following legislated tax changes that narrative sources suggest are largely uncorrelated with other factors affecting spending. The results provide no support for the hypothesis that tax cuts restrain government spending; indeed, they suggest that tax cuts may actually increase spending. The results also indicate that the main effect of tax cuts on the government budget is to induce subsequent legislated tax increases. Examination of four episodes of major tax cuts reinforces these conclusions.

      • On the contrary, here in Sask. our municiple and provincial taxes are going lower and lower, not higher and higher.

      • Which provinces have been raising taxes?

      • And wait till they get a majority. Harris will seem mild in retrospect.

      • It was Paul Martin who cut federal transfer payments to the provinces. Harper hasn't — in fact, they've increased.

    • A rising deficit now is a very good reason to cut social spending later, as J.W.B. perfected in the States …

  4. But they have lattés at Tim Horton's now! Aren't they elitist?

  5. If I ever get round to writing a book about this time in Ottawa, I may very well argue that this, in content, setting and context, is the quintessential speech of Stephen Harper's premiership.

    Are you seriously planning a book?

    Content: pro-hockey, pro-Tim Horton's, pro-Canadian business, pro-1960's hockey, pro-Pierre Berton, pro-economic competitiveness, pro-lower corporate taxes, pro-highly skilled immigrants, pro-prosperity

    Setting: Oakville, Ontario: Tim Hortons Innovation Centre (home of the titanium dioxide sprinkles)

    Context: One of Canada's most recognizable and successful companies returns to Canada; meanwhile, the debate rages about climate change and other international issues at the big UN conference in NY.

    Impact: Negligible, will be ignored by most Canadians and by the media.

  6. If I ever get round to writing a book about this time in Ottawa, I may very well argue that this, in content, setting and context, is the quintessential speech of Stephen Harper's premiership.

    Are you seriously planning a book?

    Content: pro-Tim Horton's, pro-Canadian business, pro-1960's hockey, pro-Pierre Berton, pro-economic competitiveness, pro-lower corporate taxes, pro-highly skilled immigrants, pro-prosperity

    Setting: Oakville, Ontario – Tim Hortons Innovation Centre (home of the titanium dioxide sprinkles)

    Context: One of Canada's most recognizable and successful companies returns to Canada; meanwhile, the debate rages about climate change and other international issues at the big UN conference in NY.

    Impact: Negligible, will be ignored by most Canadians and by most of the media.

  7. If I ever get round to writing a book about this time in Ottawa, I may very well argue that this, in content, setting and context, is the quintessential speech of Stephen Harper's premiership.

    Are you seriously planning a book?

    Content: pro-Tim Horton's, pro-Canadian business, pro-1960's hockey, pro-Pierre Berton, pro-economic competitiveness, pro-lower corporate taxes, pro-highly skilled immigrants, pro-prosperity

    Setting: Oakville, Ontario – Tim Hortons Innovation Centre (home of the titanium dioxide sprinkles)

    Context: One of Canada's most recognizable and successful companies returns to Canada; meanwhile, the debate rages about climate change and other international issues at the big UN conference in NY.

    Impact: Negligible, will be ignored by most Canadians and by the media.

  8. If I ever get round to writing a book about this time in Ottawa, I may very well argue that this, in content, setting and context, is the quintessential speech of Stephen Harper's premiership.

    Are you seriously planning a book?

    Content: pro-Tim Horton's, pro-Canadian business, pro-1960's hockey, pro-Pierre Berton, pro-economic competitiveness, pro-lower corporate taxes, pro-highly skilled immigrants, pro-prosperity

    Setting: Oakville, Ontario: Tim Hortons Innovation Centre (home of the titanium dioxide sprinkles)

    Context: One of Canada's most recognizable and successful companies returns to Canada; meanwhile, the debate rages about climate change and other international issues at the big UN conference in NY.

    Impact: Negligible, will be ignored by most Canadians and by the media.

  9. If I ever get round to writing a book about this time in Ottawa, I may very well argue that this, in content, setting and context, is the quintessential speech of Stephen Harper's premiership.

    Are you seriously planning a book?

    Content: pro-Tim Horton's, pro-Canadian business, pro-1960's hockey, pro-entrepreneurship, pro-Pierre Berton, pro-economic competitiveness, pro-lower corporate taxes, pro-highly skilled immigrants, pro-prosperity

    Setting: Oakville, Ontario – Tim Hortons Innovation Centre (home of the titanium dioxide sprinkles)

    Context: One of Canada's most recognizable and successful companies returns to Canada; meanwhile, the debate rages about climate change and other international issues at the big UN conference in NY.

    Impact: Negligible, will be ignored by most Canadians and by most of the media.

    • that Pierre Berton reference sure jumps out at you, doesn't it?

  10. Wow… that really was a very good speech. He didn't contradict himself once during its' entirety.

    Can't say as much for the professor's speech yesterday…

  11. Quintessential Harper speech! Yes it is. But Wow! The speech is a load of crap or should I say soggy donuts! Surely our journalist should start being just a wee bit more analytical in these photo op matters.
    Brilliant political move to get the Tim Horton crowd vote once again but truly lame economics. Like Harper's cuts to the GST. The GST cuts got him a second minority but doomed the Department of Finance's abilities to pay down the ballooning deficit and debt.
    If our economic future depends on mac-jobs created by the likes of Tim Horton companies – more fast food outlets to make us fat and cost the health care system a bundle – then Canadians are in deep doo doo!!
    But then Harper came to office pandering to the irrational side of Canadian voters and he will get elected by pandering even more to the fears and anxieties of Canadian voters.
    A great many of our high paying manufacturing jobs have disappeared never to return. Educated Canadians will have to settle for low paying service sector mac-jobs that offer few or no benefits, not even a meager pension to retire on.

    • Mr Igantieff, dont you have better things to do?

  12. “In so many ways, the story of Tim Hortons is the essential Canadian story. It is the story of success and tragedy, of big dreams in small towns, of old fashioned values and tough-fisted business, of hard work and of hockey.”

    Hmmm…careful quoting a crazy socialist like Pierre Berton. I'm guessing he wasn't being entirely complimentary…the cherry picking is amazing.

    • You can taste the political rhetoric. Good speech. The other two parties sure are bitter these days.

  13. How much did this Harperian jaunt cost the taxpayer — jet off to New York, skip on the climate change meeting, jet back, photo-op in Oakville, then back to Pittsburgh for more photo-ops?

    • Just to be clear: we have a deficit higher than 50 billion dollars, approved by both major parties, and you're still whining about how much it costs the Prime Minister to fly from Point A to Point B? Give the knee-jerk partisanship a rest.

    • And I'll bet he didn't get carbon offsets either.

    • Just to be clear: we have a deficit higher than 50 billion dollars, approved by both major parties, and you're still whining about how much it costs to fly the Prime Minister from Point A to Point B? Give the knee-jerk partisanship a rest.

      • You don't think it's wrong to waste taxpayer's money? Why? Because you're also on the public trough, posting on blogs on the public dime?

        • What kind of paranoid fantasy are you living in? I'm employed in the private sector, and I always have been. I comment on Maclean's for the same reason that most people comment here: because I enjoy it.

          • You must have a very understanding employer, because unlike so many others including myself, you comment on just about every post and even the comments through the day. Seems to me this is your day job, commenting on Maclean's blog posts, not a care in the world how taxpayers' money's being spent as long as it's being spent by the Harper government, etc etc. :-)

          • Heh… you're always good for a laugh. Classic case of the pot calling the kettle black. Let me put it this way: the time I spend here is a tiny fraction of the time you spend at redtory, or myblahg, or even chain-smoking on your balcony. ;-)

          • There's some critical reasoning for you. Waste money at will, as long as the amount is dwarfed by the deficit.

          • Waah! The Prime Minister of Canada shouldn't be allowed to fly to the US and back! It costs too much money!

            Pretty cute, Phil. Cute, but dumb.

          • CR — phil has it right. Voters notice.

    • Oh Anon
      Don't be so cynical what would you rather talk about? Hockey and timbits or climate change?
      Sit back and smile. Tim Hortons was always here – it's a franchise operation. All those business operators across Canadla have paid taxes here in Canada whatever the PM says.

      Moving their corporate headquarters here will have very little impact on employment in Oakville. Nice sentiment but very limited on facts.

      • It bothers me a great deal when people waste money, regardless of political persuasion. It would seem to me that in these economic conditions, the PMO would be just a little less tone-deaf about these things.

      • Sorry Bonnie N, I'm with Anon. He seems a skeptic, not a cynic. The sitting PM, on the other hand might be a cynic, because he seems to exhibit the belief that people are motivated selfish concerns.

    • The flights likely cost less than the hotels at the UN meeting, not to mention the cost of security.

    • In canada, he is called the Prime Minister. I know you still cant except the man is the PM. Suck it up.

  14. Do people have hockey practice at 6 AM? Or is that just one of those myths? I don't really remember any friends getting up early for hockey practice. (I swam when I was younger and I never remember seeing hockey players at the sports centre when we were there at 5:30 or 6 AM).

    • It must've been an underused rink. I remember 6am practices on a Sunday morning – and this was for house league!

      The ice time was so scarce you took it when you got it.

      • same here.

      • Move to Alberta.

    • I don't know where you lived your childhood life but I remember both – early morning hockey practices and early morning swimming and diving lessons. When you have children you make the time it seems

  15. Pure politics. Tim Horton's is one of the strongest, most powerful brands in Canada. Not surprising that Harper wants to take credit for bringing a good Canadian name home. I don't know why this couldn't have waited until after the G20.

    • Yep, a few weeks after helping pack the truck of Nortel and all its belongings, Harper's out backslapping the joe and jills for having brought Tim Horton back from the States… the place he then returned to for more photo op/tv appearances in his quest to be the new Billy May. Canada, we hardly knew yah.

      • Good one. Who cares about RIM when you got those Tim Horton voters? Who cares about those arts types at their galas, and legal crazed feminists, and those pesky climate change scientists, when you got Tims?
        With few exceptions the media never calls him out on this stuff; he doesn't even believe it himself but knows he can get away with it. Pure cynicism.

      • Yup – can't wait to bump into my old Nortel colleagues in the applicants line for jobs at Tim Hortons.

  16. My attempt at a Wherry Post :)

    "If you're going to make a new business investment in Canada, and you're concerned about taxes, the last place you will go is the province of Ontario." – Jim Flaherty Feb 29, 2008

    "The bottom line is that Canada is now not just a great place to live, it is a great place to invest and to do business." – Stephen Harper September 23, 2009

    • Richard,
      there is actually a contextual link between those two items. I think you're going to have to work on the impersonation some more.

      I have it on good authority – my local magi from a nearby mountain top, that if Wherry spoke the "context" aloud three times – POOF, Armageddon.

    • Richard,
      there is actually a contextual link between those two items. I think you're going to have to work on the impersonation some more.

      I have it on good authority – my local magi from a nearby mountain top, that if Wherry spoke the word "context" aloud three times – POOF, Armageddon.

    • Richard,
      there is actually a contextual link between those two items. I think you're going to have to work on the impersonation some more.

      I have it on good authority – my local swami from a nearby mountain top, that if Wherry spoke the word "context" aloud three times – POOF, Armageddon.

    • What has changed between then and now:

      In U.S.:
      -economic crisis in the U.S. with fears of a lost decade of economic activity.
      -increased trade protectionism and the rumblings of trade wars
      -speculation around higher income and business taxes

      In Canada:
      -Business taxes cut at federal level
      -Business tax cuts planned for Ontario
      -HST in BC and Ontario
      -Talks (and action) around free trade with the EU
      -Middle-income brackets expanded (tax cut)

      A lot has changed since Feb 08. Have you heard about this fella called Obama? He could become the Dem's nominee in November!!

  17. I guess when Pierre Berton smoked up he went to Tim's to satisfy his munchies. How does this square with Steve's anti-drug stance?

    But of course Steve said listening to things like The Beatles led to smoking up so I hope he didn't get one of those re-mastered sets that was just released.

    • Funny, I was hoping someone would give him one of those sets. Just think where it might lead.

  18. But here we are today, 14 years later, because it is now in the best interests of the company to come back to Canada today.

    Wait, I'm confused… I thought it was completely evil when someone leaves Canada for years and then returns because it's now in their best interest. How do we know Tim Hortons isn't "just visiting"?

    • I like harper but that was a good one.

  19. Interesting backdrop, Mr Harper.

    I'll be sure to remember you every time your HST hike costs me an additional 8% on my double, double, my donut, my breakfast sandwich, my iced cap …

  20. Props on reducing the corporate tax rate. The rest is pablum.

    Also, we’re going to continue cutting taxes beyond the plans laid out so far? Could we please deal with the decade of deficit promised by the government before we give ourselves even more unearned tax breaks?

  21. has anyone noticed lately that Harper attacks less and less with each speech while Iggy attacks harper more and more each speech – bizarro world on the way.

    • That because the PM is kicking the crap out of Ignatieff. It isn't fun once he starts crying.

  22. Timmy's started in the Hammer? I didn't know that.

  23. Hmmm. A choice between this and a speech at the UN, most likely following the performance of Mr. Gaddafi . . .

    Oh yeah. Harper made the right choice here.

  24. Aren't we all missing the point here?

    What innovations are being worked on at the Tim Horton's Innovation Centre?!?!?!

    Inquiring minds (and stomachs) need to know.

    • And people have the nerve to say that Harper doesn't support scientific research

  25. "while others will be raising taxes to deal with their massive debt burdens, we will be able to continue lowering taxes"

    "our long-term fiscal position is solid"

    Whatever helps you sleep at night I guess…

  26. Why couldn't Harper have given his speech at the drive-thru window?

  27. Future job prospect for the PM. Behind the counter or in the board room? I wonder? Mind you he may need the job sooner than he expected. Now woul'nt that be a laugh.

  28. Sure PM and the Cons lowered the corporate tax and put it on the backs of ordinary Canadians. Wonder how much our politicians have invested in companies. The more these companies make the more rewards for the investors at the cost to the consumer. Maybe its time to tax these companies at 60% of their gross income. They would then have no reason to hike up prices. At the same time tax all incomes over $250.000 at 100%. Measures such as these would limit the rip offs in the corporate system.

    • I'm assuming that you'd still like to have doctors in this country? University professors? Professional athletes? Lawyers? Judges? Computer specialists? Accountants? Confiscatory tax rates will drive these people from the country–and probably collapse our tax base, since the top 1% of incomes already pay a huge proportion of the taxes–something on the order of 25% of the total tax base. The problem will be the same with taxing companies–who would ever want to make a business in Canada if they're going to get taxed at 60%? The only companies that would be able to survive would be foreign corporations that can pay minimal taxes in Canada–you'd be choking off Canadian enterprise to the benefit of foreigners. Or you'd just have a situation where nobody would be willing to do business here at all, unless they're able to dump the 60% tax rate onto the consumer. This plan would be a recipe for unmitigated disaster.

  29. Attention Left Leaning commenters:

    Please note that companies are not malevolaent entitites but produce wealth for its stockholders (your Grandma's RRIF, and Mom and Dad's RRSP's), jobs for Canadians, and buy inventory and goods from other producers. (who in turn provide jobs and offer returns).

    Oh, yes, I almost forgot, they provide products that Canadians want/demand: coffee we drink, cars we drive, and even hemp blankets, & veggie burgers we proudly consume.

    Thank you for your attention,

    Signed,

    Consumer, employee, stockholder and one who benefits from the products companies provide

  30. My reaction to this speech is that it is an attempt to associate the Harper government with the things that are quintessentially Canadian – hockey, Tim Hortons, parenthood – and to paint Canada as a strong, stable country. A country that, presumably, doesn't require any more of those nasty elections or changes of government.

    It's an interesting tactic, and it just might work – though it will be difficult to earn a majority without any seats from Toronto, downtown Vancouver or Quebec.

    • have you seen the GTA numbers of late check out the Nanos regionals – very interesting and TH's is a wonderful symbol and heck a couple of hundred new jobs never hurts in Ontario right now – a lot of people making fun of this too bad so sad as they sit back and wonder why the CPC is doing better and better and no doubt even better news ahead!

  31. "Your company is such a fixture here on the street corners and in the malls that I'm not sure many canadians would believe you actually ever moved away…"

    Something about this little speech made me thing about Michael Ignatief.

    Maybe he'll become so much a part of us that it will appear he was never away.

  32. He appeals very much to the Tim Hortons crowd – uneducated, blue-collar and most likely to vote Conservative.
    Sad but true.

  33. Excellent Speech and a very good example of priorites (1) we have option 1 attend UN general Assembly and waste an hour and half out of your life listening to Omar Kahadafi raise such xcrucials issues like where he can set up his tent – or – (2) Help celebrate one of the premier flagship companies that left canada 14 years ago and has now decided to come back home and hundreds of new jobs – hmmm let me see .. I don't know it's a tough call – Harper just earned more points than Iggy will in the next month and no doubt about it. What the naysayers fail to take into consideration is that canadians want economic results right now and all of the other stuff is just white noise!

  34. Harper a PM I can be proud of : )

  35. Actually, it appears to me that the whole point of the article is to ironize on Harper's absence from the G20. While the whole world gathers there preparing the way for the Copenhague summit, our PM chooses not to represent us; he'd rather defend Canadian donuts than try to establish us as a country worth listening to. Whether you are on the left or the right doesn't matter at all here; it's about defining the importance of our country and expanding it beyond its current status as a militarily weak, relatively rich but clearly not proactive country.

  36. Tim who????

  37. What Harper fails to remember is that The Paul Martin government was on track to move corporate taxes to the point they would be in 2012 a year or 2 earlier. Harper also forgets to tell Canadians that the first GST cut was at the expense of income tax cuts that Paul Martin had instituted but failed to get changed in legislation because Harper pulled the plug with his coalition. The GST cut favoured only those at the top income levels and those that did not already pay income tax leaving the middle class to pick up the burden again. He repeated the trick agin and although he did later reduce income tax because Harper and Flaherty could not outspend the surpluses (Deemed to be overtaxation and a bad thing by Harper) – Now we have deficits – no Paul Martin rainy day fund – No reverse auction process for Government Procurement (Fortier and Baird killed that $3 billion savings opportunity) – promises that we have yet to pay for and a balanced budget horizon that keeps moving out and a Prime Minister saying he is not going to cut spending or raise taxes.
    AND THIS IS A GOOD THING?

  38. “I bought my childhood home. ”

    This made me tear up…….

    And that is some serious paneling, my friend.thank u post…..

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