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Maclean’s on the Hill: Electoral reform, mosque shooting

Also: How can Canada strike a balance on Canada-U.S. relations in the Trump era?


 

podcast

Each week, the Maclean’s Ottawa bureau sits down with Cormac Mac Sweeney to discuss the headlines of the week. This week, a broken Promise. The Trudeau government has abandoned its commitment to change Canada’s voting system before the next election. The decision has outraged the opposition, but here to defend the move is the new Democratic Institutions Minister, Karina Gould.

In the wake of the massacre at a Quebec mosque, which left six people dead, there is now a spotlight on a growing problem in Canada: far-right extremism. We speak with expert Stephanie Carvin about the difficulties security agencies face in dealing with the far right, and the likelihood of further attacks.

We may be getting closer and closer to that first meeting between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump. Former Canadian diplomat Colin Robertson joins us to discuss what Trump wants from NAFTA renegotiations, and how Trudeau has to walk a fine line with any criticism of an unpredictable president.

Finally, Cormac is joined by Maclean’s associate editor Shannon Proudfoot, who discusses controversy in the Conservative leadership race around gun ranges and resignations—and presents her weekly Ottawa Power Rankings.

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The full episode



Part 1. Trudeau abandons electoral reform

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks with the public in a lecture hall at Health Sciences Building on the University of Saskatchewan campus in Saskatoon, Wednesday, January 25, 2017. (Liam Richards/CP)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks with the public in a lecture hall at Health Sciences Building on the University of Saskatchewan campus in Saskatoon, Wednesday, January 25, 2017. (Liam Richards/CP)

The Trudeau government has abandoned its commitment to change Canada’s voting system before the next election. The decision has outraged the opposition, but here to defend the move is the new Democratic Institutions Minister, Karina Gould.



Part 2. Canada’s problem with far-right extremism

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (front, 2nd R) joins fellow MPs in a moment of silence after delivering a statement on a deadly shooting at a Quebec City mosque, in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, January 30, 2017. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (front, 2nd R) joins fellow MPs in a moment of silence after delivering a statement on a deadly shooting at a Quebec City mosque, in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, January 30, 2017. (Chris Wattie/Reuters)

In the wake of the massacre at a Quebec mosque, which left six people dead, there is now a spotlight on a growing problem in Canada: far-right extremism. We speak with expert Stephanie Carvin about the difficulties security agencies face in dealing with the far right, and the likelihood of further attacks.



Part 3. On Canada-U.S. relations, a delicate balance

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a news conference in Peterborough, Ont. Friday January 13, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a news conference in Peterborough, Ont. Friday January 13, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

We may be getting closer and closer to that first meeting between Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump. Former Canadian diplomat Colin Robertson joins us to discuss what Trump wants from NAFTA renegotiations, and how Trudeau has to walk a fine line with any criticism of an unpredictable president.



Part 4. Shannon Proudfoot’s Ottawa Power Rankings

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Cormac is joined by Maclean’s associate editor Shannon Proudfoot, who discusses controversy in the Conservative leadership race around gun ranges and resignations—and presents her weekly Ottawa Power Rankings.


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Maclean’s on the Hill: Electoral reform, mosque shooting

  1. In “A year of prophesying” (1924) HG Wells named electoral reform (“slavery to party managers” etc) as one of the main issues, blighting mankinds future, on which governments the world over could do nothing but “fumble and prevaricate.” Canadas problem is that Trudeau has become just another fumbler and prevaricator, and this is likely to further destabilise FPTP elections, producing yet more inequitable results.
    Better by far for Canada and the world to have an independent and disinterested decision on election method. BC Citizens Assembly in fact did this, only too well for the politicians liking, by recommending STV, which actually does give power to the people rather than the parties.
    HG Wells commended PR by STV as indisputably the right method compared to all the enfeebling and ineffective substitutes that politicians foist upon the voters, in order to ensure their incumbency, at the expense of government or “steering” that actually does steer properly.
    Richard Lung. “Democracy Science” with links to 3 free e-books on election method and science.

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