The political profession

Kyle Crawford considers Parliament, cabinet, politics and professionalism.

While Canadian cabinets must always be composed of people possessing a delicate balance of skills, and considering regional and demographic representation, this analysis suggests that, when cabinet is chosen, political experience is valued very heavily – perhaps at the expense of other kinds of experience.

The concern that we are privileging one form of experience over another was also shared by MPs in Samara’s MP exit interviews. One MP-turned-cabinet-minister said, “There’s a lot more talent sitting on the backbenches than sitting in the front row,” adding that those with a long partisan history are usually appointed to cabinet, “whether with the Liberals or the Conservatives.” … Several cabinet ministers expressed surprise when their appointments had little to do with their pre-parliamentary knowledge or interests. “When I was appointed to cabinet, [the policy area] came as a complete surprise to me. I didn’t see it coming,” one MP said, adding that he had no background in the area.  




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The political profession

  1. ‘“When I was appointed to cabinet, [the policy area] came as a complete surprise to me. I didn’t see it coming,” one MP said, adding that he had no background in the area.’

    Yup, good way to run a country that.

  2. Reality is that policy does not exist in a vacuum, it exists entirely within politics, depends on it. Our government, our parliament, is entirely all about politics. Thus: if you suck at politics, you suck at policy.

    • I guess that’s true but it’s a really, really sad commentary on the way we run things.

      I mean, policy without politics can lead to tyranical decisions made without any consideration of the implications on the people but policy only infused with politics leads to sloppy decisions that don’t move important issues forward and that’s where we are with this government.

  3. Emma Goldman ~ If voting changed anything, they’d make it illegal. 

  4. I don’t mind if ministers do not have expertise in their portfolio, so long as they are competent managers and listen to the advice of the experts in their employ, rather than working from their gut/truthiness.

    • Do we have any ministers that are “competent managers and listen to the advice of experts”?

  5. Hence we get Bad Bomb Grammar Baird over Chris Alexander. 

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