For the record: Dr. Leonard Sax on the collapse of parenting

We talked to the author about the perils of modern parenting


 
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Young girl shouting to camera. (Stuart McClymont/Getty Images)

Young girl shouting to camera. (Stuart McClymont/Getty Images)

Have parents lost confidence in themselves? Have they relinquished parental authority? Maclean’s writer Cathy Gulli explored those questions in a widely read story that examined a stark reality: Despite their very best intentions, parents are at risk of losing primacy over their children. And that’s a bad thing.

Readers connected with the story from the first moment we posted it online. Only a few days later, Gulli’s story is one of macleans.ca’s most read and most shared stories—ever. We wanted to give readers an opportunity to engage with Gulli and Leonard Sax, the author of The Collapse of Parenting: How We Hurt Our Kids When We Treat Them Like Grown-Ups.

We convened a live chat with Gulli and Dr. Sax. Find a recap below.

The recap


 

For the record: Dr. Leonard Sax on the collapse of parenting

  1. Thank you for the sensible information in this article. I have an opinion regarding Dr. Sax’s statement that, “Kids are not born knowing right from wrong,” pointing to longitudinal studies showing that children who are left to discover right from wrong on their own are more likely to have negative outcomes in the future.” I believe we are born having a sense of right and wrong. (Certainly, this is a nice gift!) Even thieves–unless mentally unstable–know it is wrong to take what is not theirs; the thief simply does not care. That is not to say that we do not need significant people in our lives (esp. parents), to reinforce our knowledge of right and wrong and guide us toward the right actions so we have the best chance of positive outcomes in the future.

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