A three-way hockey rink and nine other patents for unusual hockey inventions - Macleans.ca
 

A three-way hockey rink and nine other patents for unusual hockey inventions

From robot goalies to a three-sided hockey rink, here are some inventions filed with the patent office about Canada’s national pastime


 
Sidney Crosby #87 of Team Canada warms up prior to playing Team Czech Republic during the World Cup of Hockey on September 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada. (Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)

(Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)

As the world’s most hockey-obsessed nation, it would be shocking if we weren’t creating scores of new hockey-related products for an eager nation. Well, we are. Some examples from Canada’s patent office as described by their inventors:

1. Le Goalie (2002): “A goaltending apparatus that will simulate an actual lifelike goaltender. [It is] inflatable and lightweight…weather and puncture resistant. [Includes] motor that will power random set movements and sensor technology.”

La Goalie (Source: Canadian Patents Database)

La Goalie (Source: Canadian Patents Database)

2. The street hockey suit (1997): “If you ask any child or child at heart what they prefer to play street hockey with, they will tell you the hard hockey ball . . . but they really don’t have much choice but to use the tennis ball because it doesn’t hurt near as much. But with the STREET HOCKEY SUIT that problem is eliminated.”

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The Street Hockey Suit (Source: The Canadian Patents Database)

3. Cut-resistant hockey sock (2011): “A hockey sock is provided, constructed as a tube. The tube includes an outer textile layer and an inner lining including an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene yarn that confers cut-resistance to the hockey sock.” (No image available.)

4. Electrically heated ice skates (2013): “An ice `skate assembly for attachment to a boot has a skate blade and a blade heating arrangement mounted within a blade support. The blade is heated by resistive heating wire attached along a groove on each side of the blade.”

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Electrically heated ice skates (Source: The Canadian Patents Database)

5. Three-way hockey rink (2009): “The equilaterally triangular surface is divided into three distinct zones so that three teams can play a three-way hockey game. Three [goals are] equidistantly placed at each round corner.”

Three way hockey rink (Source: The Canadian Patents Database)

Three way hockey rink (Source: The Canadian Patents Database)

6. Hockey equipment vending machines (2014): “Designed specifically for the sale and provision of large and potentially unusually shaped items, such as … hockey sticks, hockey stick blades, and related accessories.”

Hockey equipment vending machine (Source: Canadian patents database)

Hockey equipment vending machine (Source: Canadian patents database)

7. Heads-up hockey (2006): “A shielding device that can be used for teaching and training hockey players to keep their eyes off the puck and to stickhandle without looking down . . . by practising with a hockey puck-concealing shield attached to their hockey stick.” (No image available.)

8. Portable hockey-puck freezer (2007): “A portable hockey puck freezer consists of a freezable gel…and is put in a freezer, along with pucks, so that when taken out of the freezer, the pucks will stay frozen for several hours until they are needed for playing.”

Portable hockey-puck freezer (Source: The Canadian Patents Database)

Portable hockey-puck freezer (Source: The Canadian Patents Database)

9. The Shtick (2000): “A regular wooden ice rink hockey stick with ‘bumper-padding’ on all feasible surfaces and edges that have potentially harmful impact with other players. A natural rubber, such as a ‘gummy’ crepe rubber would probably test well.”

The Shtick (Source: Canadian Patents Database)

The Shtick (Source: Canadian Patents Database)

10. Bladerap (1997): “This invention relates to the taping of ice hockey stick blades. A square sheet of tape with silicon paper backing makes the process of taping a hockey stick blade easier and allows for the display of large scale graphics, logos, and/or lettering on the blade.” (No image available.)

A version of this article was originally published in the Maclean’s Book of Lists Vol. 2


 

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