Afghanistan

Ghulam Faizi

I fought with Canada. Now the government is leaving my family to be killed by the Taliban.

In their words, interpreters Hameed Khan and Ghulam Faizi discuss the harrowing battle to bring their families to safety following the fall of Kabul
Representatives of the Taliban leave Gardermoen Airport after attending meetings in Oslo, Norway, on Jan. 25, 2022 (Javad Parsa/NTB via AP)

How the world is legitimizing the Taliban

Adnan R. Khan: Every political engagement and dollar spent in Afghanistan brings an internationally-sanctioned terrorist organization one step closer to unofficial recognition
Nishan is still in medical school, but few options are open to her after graduation (Photograph by Oriane Zerah)

The world left these Afghan women behind. Now they’re fending for themselves.

Educated in a Canadian-funded school, they became Afghanistan’s best and brightest young women. Today they live in fear, abandoned to the Taliban.
Multiple stills from the viral video showing a baby being lifted over the Kabul Airport wall in August, 2021. (@OmarHaidari1/Twitter)

Exclusive: The real story of baby Farhan, the child passed over barbed wire in Afghanistan

Shannon Gormley describes how the baby made it over the wall at the Kabul airport and journeyed to Canada. It is also a tale of how Western democracies revealed the nature of their fight in Afghanistan through their abandonment of it.
Passing through an early morning checkpoint in Kandahar in 2011, the year Canadian soldiers were brought home (Courtesy of Sergeant Matthew McGregor/DND-MDN)

In Afghanistan, the signs of our failure were everywhere

Paul Wells: How did the West get things so terribly wrong?
Hadia Essazada (Photograph by Farrah Skeiky; mural photograph: Wasim Mirzaie)

Post 9/11, young Afghans tasted peace. Now, Hadia Essazada is in exile.

When the Taliban fell after 9/11, Afghanistan entered a period of hope. For Essazada, it feels as if the Taliban have won again.
In this picture taken in the late hours on August 22, 2021 British and Canadian soldiers stand guard near a canal as Afghans wait outside the foreign military-controlled part of the airport in Kabul, hoping to flee the country following the Taliban's military takeover of Afghanistan. (Wakil Koshar/AFP/Getty Images)

The last trip out of Afghanistan: ‘There is no way back. Taliban are outside.’

They had close ties to Canada and were being hunted by the Taliban. Trapped in a dangerous, desperate crowd, the odds were against them.
In this picture taken in the late hours on August 22, 2021 British and Canadian soldiers help an Afghan climb up on the wall of a canal as he with others wait near the foreign military-controlled part of the airport in Kabul, hoping to flee the country following the Taliban's military takeover of Afghanistan. (Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images)

Will the crisis in Kabul move votes in Canada?

Election Image of the Day: The desperate effort to get people out of Afghanistan is front of mind in Ottawa. You wouldn’t know it from watching the campaign.
U.S soldiers stand guard along a perimeter at the international airport in Kabul, Afghanistan on Aug. 16, 2021 (AP Photo/Shekib Rahmani)

A Canadian bottleneck in Kabul is endangering innocent lives

Paul Wells: People struggling to escape and those helping them are running up against procedural confusion layered on top of constant mortal danger
Canadian troops patrol the Afghan village of Zangadin on June 14, 2006 (John Cotter/CP)

Where do Canada’s political parties stand on wars like Afghanistan?

Justin Ling: I asked the three main parties: Have we learned anything from Afghanistan? One clear theme emerges in all their answers (or lack thereof).